Skip to main content

Studentships

Studentships are a funded opportunity which is linked to a specific research project (as in, it is only available to those PhD students working on that specific project) or one that is open to any applicants in a specified field. 

Most funding is for PhD places. Schemes vary and may provide either full cover or partial funding for tuition fees, and some may also include a maintenance grant. A list of schemes currently open will be advertised below throughout the year and via the national press or on websites such as www.jobs.ac.uk.  Appointments are then made following shortlisting and interview.

Please check individual awards for eligibility as current research students are not eligible to apply for our research studentships. 

Available studentships are displayed below. These are updated regularly so if you have missed a deadline, or there are no relevant opportunities at the moment, please make sure you check again soon.

Reference Number: RS/21/14

Applications are invited for a MSc (by Research) studentship in fingerprint enhancement on polymer banknotes. The studentship is tenable for one-year full time (subject to satisfactory progress). It is a collaboration between the Lancashire Forensic Science Academy and the School of Natural Sciences at UCLan. The Studentship is open to Home/EU and International applicants. Home/EU tuition fees are covered at the appropriate rate. International applicants would be required to pay the difference in tuition fees. Appropriate bench fees will be covered.

It is expected that the successful applicant will commence in March 2022.

Project Title:

MSc (by Research) Fingerprint enhancement on polymer banknotes

Project Description:

The introduction of polymer banknotes from the bank of England is expected to improve issues related to counterfeit protection, durability and cleanliness. At the same time the visualisation of latent fingerprints deposited on the surface of the polymer notes presents challenges stemming from their multicolour design, their non-adhesive nature and the incorporation of security features with various patterns and porosities. To that end this MSc by Research project focusses on the development of effective strategies to enhance the fingerprint recovery in polymer banknotes. Particular emphasis will be given to the synthesis of novel powders and liquid formulations and their application on polymer banknotes under different forensic scenarios.

The project is a collaborative approach between the School of Natural Sciences at UCLan and the Lancashire Forensic Science Academy and it will be supervised jointly by chemists, forensic scientists and fingerprint practitioners. The experimental work will take place in Preston campus and the project is expected to start in March 2022.

Further information

Informal project related enquiries about the post can be made to either Dr Antonios Kelarakis (Akelarakis@uclan.ac.uk) or Professor Anna Williams (awilliams34@uclan.ac.uk).

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Admissions email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number RS/21/14

Closing Date: 14 January 2022
Proposed Interview Date: TBC

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

RS/21/21

Expected start date: 1 April 2022 or 1 September 2022

Applications are invited for one full time PhD (via MPhil) studentships in Criminal Justice and Policing, based in the School of Justice. The studentships are tenable for 3 years full-time (subject to satisfactory progress) and will cover the cost of tuition fees at UK rates together with a maintenance grant (£15,609 per year 2021/22 rates) for eligible applicants.

The studentship is funded by the School of Justice. The studentships are open to international applicants, however international applicants will be required to pay the difference between the UK and international tuition fee rate.

The successful applicants will be required to comply with the terms of the funding, and will be expected to contribute to research and teaching activities within the School of Justice as part of the scholarship.

Project Description

In 2017, the Police implemented a risk-based approach to managing registered sex offenders, meaning that sex offenders were given a personalised risk management plan to reduce the risk they pose to the public. This change stemmed from police recognition that sex offenders’ recidivism rates were low. As National Police Chiefs’ Council Lead for Management of Sexual and Violent Offenders, Deputy Chief Constable Michelle Skeer (2017) said: “The UK has some of the toughest powers in the world to manage registered sex offenders with low levels of reoffending.”. Consequently, this led to the introduction of an active risk management system and individual risk management plans, as well as a reactive management approach.

To date, very little research has examined the effectiveness of the bespoke reactive approach to managing sex offenders. In comparison to active manegement, the reactive approach does not involve home visits. Instead, it imposes annual notification requirements and continued monitoring from the police, whereby risk assessments are reviewed following changes to circumstances or intelligence updates. Any increase in identified risk can subsequently result in home visits being reintroduced and sex offenders being moved onto an active management system.

The School of Justice policing research team is currently undertaking a national study into the reactive management approach of sex offenders. This PhD would build upon this work to provide a more in-depth examination of this approach, in collaboration with partner constabularies which have agreed to facilitate the research. A mixed-method approach (quantitative and qualitative) to studying this topic is expected, utilising police data and police staff views and/or experiences of adopting this approach. Whilst the exact methodology has yet to be confirmed, we anticipate that a longitudinal study will provide greater insight into the effectiveness of implementing a reactive management approach to sex offenders.

Requirements

Candidates should have (or expect to hold) a UK Bachelor of Science degree at 2:1 or above in a related area (or equivalent qualification), or a Masters level qualification (e.g. MSc or MA).

International applicants require an English Language level of UKVI IELTs 6.5 (no sub-score below 6.0) or equivalent qualification.

Further information

Interested applicants are strongly encouraged to contact Prof. Sarah Kingston skingston1@uclan.ac.uk to discuss this opportunity and the project before applying.

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry via email at researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number: RS/21/21.

Closing date: Friday 7 January 2022
Interview date: TBC

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

Reference Number: RS/21/23

Applications are invited for a PhD (via MPhil) studentship within the School Schools of Natural Sciences and Engineering, based at the Preston (UK) Campus. The studentship is tenable for up to 3.5 years full-time (subject to satisfactory progress). The studentship will provide an annual stipend of £15,609 for 3.5 years. Both UK/Home and EU/International Applicants may apply but Tuition Fees will only be covered at the UK/Home rate for up to 3.5 years. EU/International Applicants would be expected to pay the difference between the UK/Home fee rate and EU/International fee rate. Other Allowances – up to £2,250 per annum bench fees.

It is expected the successful applicant will commence in March 2022.

Project Title:
Efficient Deep Surrogate Models for Inverse Problems

Project Description:

Applying imaging techniques for industrial or biomedical applications frequently requires solving non-trivial inverse problems that need to be solved numerically. Such inverse problems are seeking to reveal object properties, which cannot be observed directly from the measurements. The inverse problems can be seen as an inversion of the forward or observation model. By the nature of the corresponding experimental setup the inverse problems are ill-posed or severely ill-defined (i.e. the solution may not exist, or if exists it may be very sensitive for the observation errors) see Karageorghis et al. (2013). Even, when an ill-pose inverse problem can be re-defined through regularisation it still poses challenges as resulting regularisation parameters need to be estimated to find a compromise between robustness and fidelity of the solution. The redefined problem may still be ill-defined, which effectively means that significant changes in the hidden (non-observable) space will only result in very small changes (often below the measurement noise level) in the observation space. Therefore, efficient, accurate, stable, and reliable approaches are required but these are difficult to obtain analytically. The added difficulty, after discretisation of the problem, is typically a very high dimensionality of the non-observable space, e.g. in medical image reconstruction, the dimensionality of the “hidden” space can easily exceed 1M. This research project aims to tackle this problem in a numerically efficient way.

Although the mathematical and statistical approach described Dyhoum et al. 2014, 2016 & 2017 provides speed-ups compared to other existing methods, it is still too slow to be useable in practice, e.g. in medical diagnostics. To address this challenge, the proposed project will integrate Machine/Deep Learning to the existing mathematical/statistical approaches to speed-up physics/knowledge-based modelling – i.e. PDE solvers. For example, in many instances, state-of-the-art PDE solvers require hours or days to provide a usable solution. With the adaptation of Machine Learning surrogate modelling, this could be potentially done in seconds or minutes making the computation practically usable in medical diagnostics. Such approaches, proposing Deep Learning to construct fast surrogate models for physics-based simulations, have been very recently proposed in the literature, e.g. Kasim et al. (2020), He et al. (2021), ICLR (2022)). The project will be set up in a generic context of solving inverse problems, with methods validation using simulated as well as established real MRI and CT problems.

The successful candidate must be self-motivated, hold Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent qualification) at 2:1 level or above in mathematics, physics, or computer science, and has prior knowledge of Numerical Analysis, and Bayesian statistics or process-based modelling.

Applicants require an English Language level of UKVI IELTS 6.5 (no sub-score less than 6.0) (or acceptable UCLan equivalent qualification).

Further information

Informal project related enquiries about the post can be made to: Dr. Taysir Dyhoum via email TDyhoum@uclan.ac.uk, and Professor Bogdan Matuszewski via email bmatuszewski1@uclan.ac.uk

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number RS/21/23

Closing Date: 24 January 2022
Proposed Interview Date: TBC

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

Reference RS/21/24

One full-time PhD (Direct) studentship is available at the University of Central Lancashire, via the National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration North West Coast (NIHR ARC NWC). NIHR ARC NWC is one of 15 regional ARCS funded by the NIHR to bring together those needed to support research to improve health and care. Our vision is to address the considerable health inequalities across our region through the collaborative production and implementation of high-quality applied health research in our five themes. Research supported by the ARC NWC must be relevant to the needs of the diverse communities served by the NIHR ARC NWC and its local health and care system, and be generalisable across health and care nationally, as well as within the local health and care system where it is conducted. Our Doctoral Fellows are distributed across the themes and universities and are a crucial part of our Academic Career Development Strategy.

The studentship will be hosted within Faculty of Health and Care Hub, one of the largest providers of health and care education and professional development in the North West, which seeks to develop high quality health and care research, implementation, and innovation to improve service and care delivery. Successful candidates will be supported by a dedicated supervisory team and have access to a broad range of expertise from colleagues within the Lancashire Clinical Trials Unit, the Health Technology Assessment Group, the Research Facilitation and Delivery Unit, and the Research Design and Statistical Support Team.

The full-time studentship is tenable up to 2 years full-time (PhD Direct) and will cover the cost of tuition fees at Home rates. A stipend in line with the UK Research Council is payable at £15609 per annum, and an additional Research Training Support Grant of up to £1000 per year will be paid for approved research costs.

Due to funding restrictions, the studentships are open to Home applicants only. It is expected the successful applicant(s) will commence on 1st April 2022.

Potential applicants must:

  • consult the HIAT hiat.org.uk and demonstrate consideration of the toolkit in their research proposal
  • discuss their research proposal with the appropriate Director of Studies (DoS) prior to application

Applicants should have (or expect to have been formally awarded by 31st March 2022) at least a UK Bachelor honours degree at second class (upper division) level (or equivalent qualification) in a relevant discipline

Applicants must have completed and been awarded any current course of study by the proposed start date (before 1st April 2022) otherwise they will not be shortlisted.

Applicants require an English Language level of UKVI IELTS 6.5 (no sub-score less than 6.0) or acceptable UCLan equivalent qualification.

Further information and application process:

Please see Appendix 1 for further information.

Completed application forms and a fully completed research proposal (not more than 1000 words excluding references) related to the title you are applying for should be returned to the Research Student Registry by email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number RS/21/24.

Applicants MUST ALSO state the title of the project they are applying for, and the mode of study (PhD Direct) where indicated on the application form. Application forms received without this information will not be considered.

Closing Date: 20 January 2022
Fixed Interview Date: 3 February 2022

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

Reference Number: RS/22/01

Applications are invited for a PhD (via MPhil) studentship in the Perception and Cognitive Neuroscience Group. The studentship will provide an annual stipend of £15,609.

It is expected that the successful applicant will commence in April 2022.

The School of Psychology and Computer Science is part of the College of Science & Technology and is located in the purpose-built Darwin Building. The School is well resourced, with an extensive range of state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment, including an established Co-Registration Laboratory, Health Psychology Suite and Cognitive Ergonomics/Human Factors Laboratory. The School has a thriving community of PhD and MSc students and has particularly strong links with regional universities, law enforcement agencies, schools, community groups and NGOs. Essential criteria for the post in terms of qualifications and experience include having a BSc and MSc in Psychology or a related discipline, as well as evidence of research experience at postgraduate level in the context of psychophysiological studies. In terms of skills, the essential criteria include strong analytical skills evidenced by experience of a range of quantitative research methods, an excellent understanding of a range of statistical methods, and the ability to work independently as well as part of a team. Applicants need to meet all essential criteria on the person specification to be considered for interview. This position is based in Preston. For informal enquiries please contact Dr John Marsh: JEMarsh@uclan.ac.uk Please apply online via www.uclan.ac.uk/jobs or by contacting Human Resources on 01772 892324 quoting reference number. CV's will not be considered unless accompanied by a completed application form.

Project Title:

Enhancement of Security Surveillance Activities through Cognitive Interventions

Project Description:

This project investigates potential interventions that address limitations in human cognitive capabilities. For example, in high-risk situations such as security surveillance, operators face cognitive challenges pertaining to distraction, multitasking, vigilance loss and cognitive overload. This necessitates the genesis and evaluation of techniques for human augmentation to improve cognitive capacities including working memory, high-order cognitive functions, cognitive flexibility and enhanced visual monitoring abilities. This research project will empirically evaluate cognitive enhancement interventions and their potential to augment security surveillance activities. The proposed programme of research comprises two stages entailing: 1) the evaluation and comparison of cognitive enhancement techniques on key cognitive processes involved in security surveillance. 2) Investigation of whether the effects and their time-course observed in 1) can be scaled up (e.g., transferred) to complex, ecologically valid, cognitive tasks.

Further information

Informal project related enquiries about the post can be made to John Everett Marsh (jemarsh@uclan.ac.uk)

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number RS/22/01

Closing Date: 21 January 2022

Proposed Interview Date: 28 January 2022

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

Reference Number: RS/22/02

Applications are invited for one PhD (via MPhil) studentship in the Institute of Citizenship, Society and Change. The student will sit within the School of Social Work, Care and Community. The studentship is tenable for 3.5 years full time [subject to satisfactory progress] and will cover the cost of tuition fees at UK rates (£4550 per annum) together with a maintenance grant (£15,609 per year 2021/22 rates) for eligible applicants. The studentships are open to international applicants, however, international applicants will be required to pay the difference between the UK and international tuition fee rate.

It is expected the successful applicant will commence 1 April 2022.

Project Title:

Food Citizenship: ‘who decides what I eat?’

Project Description:

The research will examine people’s lived experience of deciding what to eat, in the context of both conventional and alternative food systems, in order to understand how to harness and develop the power and agency required to deliver food sovereignty and participatory decision making in local food systems.

Research questions:

  1. To identify where power lies within food systems (conventional and local), how it can be reclaimed and how disenfranchised people can find a voice.
  2. To determine how and where trust is located in the food system. Identify who is trusted and why/ why not.
  3. To explore understandings of risks in the food system as perceived by consumers and producers of food.
  4. To determine how individuals and society/ groups can have more agency in deciding what to eat and changing food systems
  5. To explore whether agroecology can bring about food security or eliminate food insecurity in the UK, and to determine what is needed for this to happen.
  6. To identify the skills and training needed by different cohorts of people and in different levels of society, and to identify how such skills can be developed and rolled out.

Methodology:

Informed by Critical Inquiry, Community Conversations (derived from the educationalist Paulo Freire’s work), will be used to explore issues around food citizenship and food sovereignty with ten cohorts of ~eight people across the UK. These will be supplemented by other qualitative methods (e.g. interviews, focus groups, visual methods), to be agreed in liaison with the candidate.

The successful applicant will be expected to contribute to research activities within the Institute of Citizenship, Society and Change as part of the scholarship.

Further information

Informal project related enquiries about the post can be made to Dr Mags Adams, madams5@uclan.ac.uk

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number RS/22/02

Closing Date: 16 January 2022
Proposed Interview Date: 19 January 2022

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

Reference Number: RS/22/04

Applications are invited for a PhD (via MPhil) studentship in the Centre for Smart Materials, within the School of Natural Sciences. The studentship is tenable for up to 3 years full time [subject to satisfactory progress]. Both Home/EU and international Applicants may apply, International students will be required to pay the difference in Home/EU fee rate. The studentship will provide an annual stipend of £15,609 per year (subject to satisfactory progress).

It is expected the successful applicant will commence 1 April 2022.

Project Title:

Lipid-Based Formulations of Poorly Soluble and Highly Important Drug Molecules

Project Description:

Highly important drugs against major diseases including cancer, malaria, Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases suffer from poor solubility and low bioavailability issues. Emerging lipid-based drug carriers are set to address these issues owing to their superior physicochemical and non-toxic properties. Being amphiphilic in nature, lipid molecules self-assemble into a remarkable range of nanostructures (when mixed with water), which, in turn, can form hierarchically organized architectures. These systems are suitable for loading of either or a combination of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and amphiphilic drugs, which forms the very basis the current project.

This project will commence through optimizing formulations that we have developed recently. It will comprise, a wide range of chemical/biochemical characterization and pre-clinical trials as well as efforts towards developing products with the help of our collaborators. Upon establishing fundamentals and protocols of formulations, the focus will be directed towards carefully chosen commercial drugs that suffer from the poor solubility. Formulations will be characterized thoroughly followed by an optimization for their stability and physical forms. Couple of newly synthesized active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) against malaria will be formulated at the end part of the project.

The project is highly interdisciplinary and potentially productive, and benefits from complementary expertise of supervisory team as well as external research collaborators.

Further information

Informal project related enquiries about the post can be made to Dr Chandrashekhar V Kulkarni (Email: cvkulkarni@uclan.ac.uk).

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk quoting the studentship reference number RS/22/04.

Closing Date: 21 January 2022
Proposed Interview Date: 2 February 2022

Current UCLan research students will not be eligible to apply for this research studentship.

For more postgraduate research funding options visit scholarships and bursaries.