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Dr Neil Wilson

Research Associate
School of Community Health and Midwifery
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Neil is a Research Associate in the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, where he has worked as part of the Research Support Team since 2015. Neil has a background in Social Psychology and prior to joining UCLan he worked at the University of Exeter.

Neil works on a variety of health research projects as part of the Research Support Team, often working closely with NHS Trusts and other external organisations in conducting research and evaluations. Since joining the University he has worked on multiple projects, including an investigation of how young people with long term conditions experience transition services in health care, an evaluation of a school nurse text messaging service, an exploration of a self-monitoring intervention for atrial fibrillation patients, an evaluation of a specialist palliative care service, and a scoping review of the health harms of interpersonal violence. More recently Neil has developed research interests in the impact of green space and nature on health and wellbeing.

Neil completed a BSc and MSc in Psychology at the University of Lancaster. He went on to complete his ESRC funded PhD there, investigating the role of group processes and social identity in bystander intervention in violence. Neil then worked as a Social Psychologist at the University of Surrey, and subsequently the University of Exeter, where his research focused on social and group identity and in particular its impacts on prosocial behaviour. He has experience in quantitative and experimental research methods, and since working at UCLan has developed experience and skills in qualitative methods in health research, having conducted numerous interviews and focus groups with a range of participants.

  • PhD Social Psychology, Lancaster University, 2011
  • MSc Social Psychology, Lancaster University, 2007
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology, Lancaster University, 2005
  • Green space, nature, and health and wellbeing
  • Health harms of interpersonal violence