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  • Centre for Citizenship and Community

Centre for Citizenship and Community

Established within the School of Social Work and the RSA, with the Royal Society for Public Health and the Personal Social Services Research Unit at the London School of Economics, the Centre for Citizenship and Community, directed by UCLan’s Professor David Morris, provides support for policy, research, learning and local practice in community engagement and social inclusion.

Expertise and Subject Areas

Our Mission

‘To realise its full potential, a program must enlist those being helped as partners, co-workers and co-producers of the intended outcomes’ Edgar Cahn

At a time of great financial challenge, public service organisations need to understand how best to facilitate and engage with communities in services that promote co-operation, equity, inclusion and wellbeing. In the world of personalised services for independence, a focus on how to promote inter-dependence is more important than ever. This means knowing how to place a proper value on the community contribution to developing, commissioning, governing and delivering services.

The Centre for Citizenship and Community is a response to the growing imperative for the study and development in practice of effective community approaches to engaging communities and working with the assets and value that they represent. We provide support for policy, research, learning and local practice in community engagement and social inclusion. Our vision is to see services across the full spectrum of public policy being designed to integrate in everyday practice the value of social and community assets and networks in achieving wellbeing and inclusion outcomes.

We need to understand the value to services of ordinary people – of the ‘social dividend’ that communities represent. Bringing together policy, research and practice, The Centre for Citizenship and Community can help to achieve this goal, enabling services that can work locally alongside communities in the most effective, appreciative and cost effective way possible. We work with service organisations and communities in health and social care and across the spectrum of public service settings through a network of associates together with universities and the RSA. This is a unique breadth of experience, knowledge and expertise.

You can download the Social Commissioning Course Flyer here

Impact

Through the Centre we can offer dedicated support Integrated Programmes for developing social and community-based commissioning:

  • Service development and redesign, including economic modelling and cost-benefit analysis, organisational, leadership and workforce development

Professor David Morris presented his research report findings on the value of connected communities at the RSA Communities Creating Health & Wellbeing event 30/11.

In response to an invitation from the Wellesley Institute in Toronto, Ontario, Professor David Morris undertook a week-long lecture tour on his research and the work of the Centre for Citizenship and Community on Connected Communities.

This is backed up by:

Opportunities for bespoke accredited and CPD learning programmes
Programme evaluation and research evidence
The Centre for Citizenship and Community works nationally and internationally with our partners and associates to offer help in achieving the best possible outcomes for organisations that see their communities as key partners in their success.

When the Centre works with your organisation, you also have the opportunity to become a stakeholder in the Centre, to have your work internationally recognised, built upon for wider benefit, to help broaden the base of evidence and inform the course of policy.

On 21st April 2016, following the ODESSA (ageing in place programme) events at Tsinghua University with colleagues from France and China, David Morris and Manjit Bola travelled from Beijing to Ningbo in southern China’s Zhejiang province with colleagues from Tsinghua to launch ODESSA’S Connected Communities work package in China. The initial meeting hosted by senior local government officials and community leaders, provided for a discussion on the context of community activity in Ningbo led by the lead for older people’s services in the city and a presentation by David on the Connected Communities study and its team’s proposals to use the approach to understand the role and potential of community networks in Ningbo as part of the ODESSA programme.

The meeting was joined for David’s presentation by older people from communities closely linked to two of the older people’s service, or community centres in the city. David, Manjit, together with the lead for the work package in China, Professor Pei and her colleagues then visited the two communities and their centres. Great enthusiasm was expressed for the programme and the scope for understanding the value of connectivity embodied in work with older people which in Ningbo is concerned with local inter-generational voluntary support matched to person and need and with forms of continuing life-long learning opportunities.

Supported by David and Manjit, Professor Pei and her team will now go on to develop the fieldwork tools and community research approach with local people in order to complete the Chinese fieldwork for the Connected Communities work package during the remainder of 2016.

 

Our Events

Our conferences and seminars

  • Excluded: Exploring the Barriers to, and Facilitators of Personal Budgets in Mental Health.
Speakers: Dr Manjit Bola, Tina Coldham and Zoe Robinson. Wednesday 17th February 2016.

More information on how to book onto the event from The Centre for Citizenship and Community

  • RSA Communities Creating Health & Wellbeing event 30/11

Professor David Morris presented his research report findings on the value of connected communities at the RSA Communities Creating Health & Wellbeing event on 30th November 2015.

  • People's Health Trust

The People's Health Trust (PHT) have been working with the Centre for Citizenship and Community at the University of Central Lancashire to support some of our Local Conversations partners with their local engagement processes. Read the PHT's annual review here.

  • CCC LAUNCH

CCC was formally launched as a way of taking forward Connected Communities, a five year RSA/UCLan project that has piloted local interventions for achieving health, wellbeing and inclusion via enhancing the power of social networks. The event took place at the RSA in 2013.

Key quotes from the launch:

For UCLan, Professor Rod Dubrow Marshall, former Pro Vice-Chancellor:

“This is a partnership for innovation; for enabling a new appreciation of communities and of public services designed to reflect the real value of community connection for inclusion and opportunity. With the challenge of engaging communities in the public policy spotlight, the Centre for Citizenship and Community is well placed to meet this effectively through the integration of shared learning, practical research and innovative practice that is so much part of UCLan's contemporary vision and approach.”

For RSA, Steve Broome, Director of Research:

“If we are to prosper, socially and economically, in the face if austerity, we need new ways of understanding, growing and mobilising the significant assets and relationships that exist in our communities, and in our public, voluntary and private sector institutions. Further, we need to consider and work with our communities as networks and help to weave these networks to become more inclusive and socially productive. The partnership we have developed in the new Centre for Citizenship and Community offers new ways to address these challenges and opportunities, and can help to transform how we design and deliver public services and social support.”

For RSPH, Shirley Cramer Chief Executive said:

“The RSPH is pleased to support the new Centre for Citizenship and Community. We believe that community development is at the heart of addressing health inequalities as well as improving wellbeing at all levels of society. Only such a bottom-up approach, where individuals come together to mobilise their joint assets and are provided with support and encouragement to take responsibility for their own health behaviours, can we build a society that fosters wellness and resilience.”

 

  • EXPERT SEMINAR SERIES: Connected Communities and Dementia

How can civil society organisations and communities enable the wellbeing and citizenship of people with dementia?

Linked to the areas of policy in which the Centre is engaged, our first seminar was held on 27th November 2013. Hosted by RSPH at their Portland Place offices in London 2013, the theme of the seminar was dementia. For further details click here.

The seminar aimed to provide an opportunity for participants to be informed about the Centre's dementia related work and to provide for the contribution of expertise and shared learning in this priority area for policy and practice.

The Centre's work programmes of particular relevance to dementia include:

  1. The Dementia Friendly Cities programme, being run in conjunction with the UK Healthy Cities Network (which is co-ordinated at UCLan),
  2. the role of the Centre as part of the Dementia Friendly Communities initiative led by the Alzheimer’s Society,
  3. the Dementia Champions Group, established to deliver the PM’s ‘Dementia Challenge’; and
  4. the Centre's leadership on behalf of the Champions Group of a task group on the role of civil society and
  5. the voluntary sector in relation to dementia friendly communities.

The seminar’s delegates represented a range of organisations with a concern for a social approach to dementia and with a specific interest in questions concerning of the part that communities play in enabling the wellbeing and inclusion of people with dementia as citizens.

Delegates were welcomed to the event by Shirley Cramer, Chief Executive, RSPH and David Morris, Director, Centre for Citizenship and Community, UCLan, FRSA.

The seminar was opened by Catherine Wilton, Acting Director of the Connected Communities programme at RSA, the Centre's key partner, with whom it is working on the Connected Communities programme. Catherine outlined the Connected Communities model and explored possibilities for its application in dementia.

Karishma Chandaria of the Alzheimer’s Society then outlined the Dementia Friendly Communities programme of the Society, describing its range of partners and, in particular the extent of business support for the initiative.

Stephen Woods, Co-ordinator, UK Healthy Cities Network at UCLan discussed the city wide challenge approach to Dementia.

Douglas Inchbold, Public Health Development Manager, presented a profile of the Manchester Supporting Health Dementia Programme and its features:

  • dementia nurse in local communities,
  • working with GPs on dementia awareness, supporting management of dementia, improving access to Health Trainers and better support for carers,
  • developed integrated care for LTCs,
  • dementia pathways as standard, with risks linked to pathways; and
  • working with housing associations, police, fire stations, dentists, shops and other commercial organisations

He discussed a proposal to work with the Centre for Citizenship and Community in a project to promote social network development within 2 wards – Cheetham and Crumpsall as part of new care pathway model based on realising community assets.

Group discussions

These were focused on identifying and discussing the evidence and experience of good practice, guided by three questions:

  • How do we understand citizen roles in dementia?
  • How is citizenship to be enhanced through better use of social and community network connections - what needs to happen at community level?
  • Shifting organisational culture - what do organisations need to do?

Good Practice identified

Health and social care integration: gathering progress on health and social care integration is likely to be beneficial in relation to dementia as evidenced by local experience such as that in Bolton.

'Staying well' Workers in GP practices – offer holistic assessment and then work on a social prescribing model; the importance that this programme places on social connection rather than intervention has obvious relevance in dementia.

Availability of key information: of particular importance for families and carers.

This led to further collective discussion on the barriers to a more comprehensive community- oriented approach with the scope to challenge pre-conceived and stigmatising notions of dementia and promote instead, the values of inclusion and individual citizen-based contribution. Barriers include:

The impact of insufficient approaches to evaluation: methodology is needed for evaluating participatively the benefits of social networks for people with dementia and their carers. The potential of short term real evaluation and social action research approaches involving case study methods were highlighted as a way of meeting the growing need for local evidence.

Community Development approaches are felt to be insufficiently 'dementia - friendly'. This could be redressed by:

  • Commissioning to support communities and their assets
  • Effective cost modelling of preventative approaches
  • Evaluation models that make sense for community development activity
  • Review of evidence of community development with relevance in dementia

Seminar summary

The seminar was felt to have:

  • familiarised participants with the Centre for Citizenship and Community, including the work of RSPH and RSA and with Connected Communities method and approach,
  • offered a forum for the exchange of expert experience and knowledge,
  • enabled the airing of fresh perspectives on innovation and emergent approaches to practice, contributed to strategic work of National Champions Group - possibility for participating organisations to share future learning in dementia; and 
  •  provided information on the Healthy Cities and Alzheimer’s Society work


 

News

Ground-breaking report shows the value of connected communities

Connected Communities in Canada – Partnership Development in Toronto


Launched on the 20th May at the RSA, the Centre is guided by the practical approach set out by Connected Communities, a five year RSA/UCLan project that has piloted local interventions for achieving health, wellbeing and inclusion via enhancing the power of social networks.

At the launch, Professor Rod Dubrow Marshall, UCLan said:
“This is a partnership for innovation; for enabling a new appreciation of communities and of public services designed to reflect the real value of community connection for inclusion and opportunity. With the challenge of engaging communities in the public policy spotlight, the Centre for Citizenship and Community is well placed to meet this effectively through the integration of shared learning, practical research and innovative practice that is so much part of UCLan's contemporary vision and approach.”

Steve Broome, RSA Director of Research said:
“If we are to prosper, socially and economically, in the face if austerity, we need new ways of understanding, growing and mobilising the significant assets and relationships that exist in our communities, and in our public, voluntary and private sector institutions. Further, we need to consider and work with our communities as networks and help to weave these networks to become more inclusive and socially productive. The partnership we have developed in the new Centre for Citizenship and Community offers new ways to address these challenges and opportunities, and can help to transform how we design and deliver public services and social support.”

Shirley Cramer CBE, Chief Executive of the Royal Society for Public Health, said:
“The RSPH is pleased to support the new Centre for Citizenship and Community. We believe that community development is at the heart of addressing health inequalities as well as improving wellbeing at all levels of society. Only such a bottom-up approach, where individuals come together to mobilise their joint assets and are provided with support and encouragement to take responsibility for their own health behaviours, can we build a society that fosters wellness and resilience.”

Staff

Members

David Morris - University Staff
David Morris is Professor of Mental Health, Inclusion and Community in the School of Social Work, University of Central Lancashire where he is also Director of the new Centre for Citizenship and Community. He holds a Visiting Academic Associate post in the Health Service and Population Research Department of the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London. David was Director of the cross – government National Social Inclusion Programme (2004-2009) at the National Institute for Mental Health in England.

David has founded and led a number of programmes in the field of inclusion and health equalities and contributes widely both nationally and internationally in a range of advisory and consultative roles to the development of policy and practice on social inclusion such as the Inclusion Health programme at the Department of Health.

With a professional background in social work and management of Mental Health services in social care, David’s career has spanned statutory and voluntary sectors, central and local government, social care, health and academia. His PhD on community engagement and primary care was undertaken at the University of Manchester. He has been a member of the College of Occupational Therapy Research Foundation Advisory Group and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts with whom he is working on ‘Connected Communities’, a five year programme on social networks and community capital.

Hári Sewell - Associate
Hári has a wide range of operational and strategic leadership experience in health and social care. He is a social worker by background with 20 years’ experience. Hári has held a number of senior roles within social care and the NHS most recently Executive Director for Organisational Development in an inner-city Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust.

Previous to this Hári has held roles as Director of Substance Misuse Services, Director of Social Care, Business Link Inspector in Social Services Inspectorate, Regional Implementation for National Service Framework and Head of Strategic Planning in Housing and Social Services.

Current areas of work:

  • Social care in mental health
  • Equality and Diversity, Race Equality
  • Organisational change and development
  • Service users as change agents
  • Cost improvement programmes
  • Policy and strategy development
  • Service Improvement
  • Group facilitation
  • Development of person centred recovery focused mental health services
  • Presenting to top level audiences

Dr Karen Linde - Associate
Dr Karen Linde has held senior appointments in academic and development contexts (mainly the NHS) with responsibility for the design of large scale change initiatives, improvement, evaluation and research activities. She is working at strategic levels with the policy, workforce and engagement issues for the public sector and related evidence gathering, briefing and evaluative activity. She also has a background in programme design and the application of strengths based leadership and improvement interventions with diverse stakeholders.

She has particular expertise in partnership working and mental health and has carried out innovative research in the area of social identity, team working, the implementation of psycho-social interventions, and the design of ‘system level’ evaluative methods. Karen has a continuing development role in the area of inequalities, building on prior work in the equalities field, with a focus on improving community level responses to violence and abuse. She provides consultancy to diverse organisations seeking to develop sustainable ways of working with disturbing areas of human experience and of working effectively with communities in conflict.

Dr Manjit Bola - University Staff
Manjit is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire, with over twenty years of teaching and research experience in the field of Health Psychology. She is currently the course leader for the Leadership, Inclusion and Community Programmes, and her research interests include health, race and gender issues. Manjit specialises in developing and managing bespoke courses and projects, in particular for programmes of work involving community engagement and working with marginalised communities with an aim to reduce inequality and exclusion. Together with colleagues from the RSA, she is currently conducting research into Social Inclusion and Connected Communities.

Teaching:

  • Course Leader PG Cert Excellence in Leadership for Inclusion and Community
  • Course Leader Making Personalisation Effective in Mental Health
  • Course Leader Community Engagement Programme
  • Postgraduate Students Research Supervisor
  • Module Leader Inclusion and Community
  • Module Leader Advanced Research Methods

Special projects

  • Project Coordinator and lead Researcher on the RSA Connected Communities Project (examining the links between social networks and wellbeing)
  • Researching Drug misuse issues in Diverse Communities
  • Researching Mental wellbeing in BME communities
  • Researching Refugee and asylum seekers experiences of social care

Zoe Robinson - Business and Research Coordinator and Associate
Zoe has worked as a forensic health care assistant at West London Mental Health Trust and managed mental health and ex-offender projects for Stonham Housing Association. Zoe was seconded to the Social Exclusion Unit to contribute to their mental health project, providing advice on front line issues and led on several policy areas. Zoe then implemented the report’s recommendations as part of the National Institute for Mental Health (in England), as a founder member of the National Social Inclusion Programme.

At the National Mental Health Development Unit Zoe led the mental health component of PSA 16, on behalf of the Department of Health across national, regional and local structures and worked with DH, NMHDU and other government departments to ensure that housing and employment support are seen as part of the standard offer of mental health services.

Recently Zoe has been working with 3rd sector organisations to develop strategic alliances and partnership led pathways with the NHS, especially Foundation Trusts and Clinical Commissioning Groups. This work has included:

  • developing organisational health strategies
  • undertaking policy analysis and literature reviews
  • pathways redesign including costs and outcomes analysis
  • organisational and individual capacity building
  • identifying and developing business and commissioning opportunities, including partnerships across sectors.

Christa Drennan - Associate
Christa is an accredited psychotherapist with an MA in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Christa has a wide range of academic, policy, commissioning and operational experience and knowledge; having worked in primary and secondary care, national policy implementation programmes and universities.

Christa currently works in a London Trust as a Substance Misuse and Dual Diagnosis Lead, with responsibility for three tier 3 prescribing services for drug users and two prescribing services for alcohol addiction.

Christa also works as an Associate Lecturer, University of Central Lancashire where she has developed a Post Graduate Certificate focused on Community Engagement and the Arts.

Joanna Hicks - Associate
Joanna has a background in social work, community engagement, marketing and public relations. She has gained experience in managerial positions within private and public sectors, the latter including both academic and practice roles. For the last 10 years she has focused on mental health and substance misuse issues. Her current particular areas of interest include co-production projects in secondary mental health services and mindfulness in mental health care.

Trained in solution focused therapy and motivational interviewing techniques, Joanna currently holds a part-time post in a low-secure mental health hospital focusing on issues of recovery and integrating family and carer perspectives.

Projects enabling greater social inclusion have been a long-standing area of activity for Joanna and she holds a postgraduate qualification in delivering equality and managing diversity. She spent 5 years working for the University of Central Lancashire where she played a key role in developing and managing projects designed to reduce inequality. She holds a strong commitment to social justice, environmental sustainability and community development.

Dr Fabian Davis - Associate
Fabian is a Lead Consultant Clinical Psychologist for Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust. He manages the psychological therapies service for people with complex mental health issues and is Lead for Social Inclusion in the London Borough of Bromley. He has worked in the NHS for 35 years as a clinician, service co-developer and researcher.

Fabian is Chair of the British Psychological Society Professional Practice Board’s Social Inclusion Group and was the founding Chair of the BPS Psychosis and Complex Mental Health Faculty.

After extensive involvement in a number of hospital reprovision programmes, since 1998 he has worked on national social inclusion policy development and implementation programmes at the Sainsbury Centre, NIMH(E) and CSIP and advised the Cabinet Office’s Social Exclusion Unit as the BPS representative.

In Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust he is currently joint Trust Lead for developing Peer Support where he founded and still chairs the, Cabinet Office award winning, Developing Valued Lifestyles Partnership (Develop); an inclusion collaborative involving mainstream providers of goods and services, mental health service personnel and people with mental health issues and their families.

Fabian has lectured internationally and published widely on social inclusion policy development and implementation in adult mental health and learning disability and most recently, for the BPS, in the parenting training field. His doctoral research was on the experience of social exclusion, recovery and mental health from the service user perspective.

Tina Coldham - Associate
Tina has been a mental health service user for many years, and is still a practicing depressive! She became a user activist through setting up self-help groups, and also being part of a local successful campaigning user group. This has led to wider regional, national and international involvement.

Tina managed a community mental health development project in the voluntary sector for four years. She then joined the Centre for Mental Health Services Development England (CMHSDE) at Kings College London. From 2003 to 2011, she worked for the Health and Social Care Advisory Service (HASCAS) on various national projects, research, and investigations. Tina is an experienced freelance trainer, lecturer and does research and consultancy all from a user perspective.

Her areas of expertise include user involvement; co-production; personalisation; survivor research, peer support, and she holds a PG Certificate in Strategic Social Care Leadership.

Tina is currently Co-Chair of the Social Care Institute for Excellence’s (SCIE) Co-Production Network and a SCIE trustee, and has stepped down as Chair of the National Survivor User Network having led this from the project planning stage to independence.

Catherine Wilton - Associate
Catherine is a former Department of Health (DH) Advisor on social capital and now runs Making the Connections consultancy. She set up the Building Community Capacity project for DH, now part of the Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) Partnership, bringing together councils, think tanks, national provider and third sector organisations to share and develop approaches to building social capital.

Catherine developed and leads the Leadership for Empowered Communities programme on behalf of six national partners including ADASS, Skills for Care and the National Skills Academy. The programme is co-produced with people who use services and was highly rated in a recent independent evaluation by the New Economics Foundation.

Catherine has extensive experience in the public sector, was a senior manager in the NHS and has a background in education. She was an elected councillor (2000-2008), and was Cabinet Member for Culture and Sport for four years. Specific areas of expertise include: asset-based working, co-production, strategy and political awareness, partnership and cross-sector working, leadership, coaching and organisational development, communications and PR.

Catherine has written various guides on developing social capital including a recent publication on personalising dementia care and dementia-friendly communities. Other recent work has included consultancy for the Local Government Association’s Ageing Well programme, Macintyre, Scope and Groundswell Partnership. She is currently working with OPM to develop a framework to support Health and Wellbeing Boards develop a community approach to wellbeing. In her spare time she is starting up a timebank in her local community.

Internal Associates:

Dr Julie Ridley
Julie joined the school as a Senior Research Fellow in September 2006. Prior to this she was an independent researcher/evaluator, and has held a number of research, information technology and development posts in local government, in independent sector organisations including BASW. Originally from the North West she has spent over 20 years working in health and community research in Scotland and has PhD from Edinburgh University.

Jez Buffin
Jez has a background in law and social work. He qualified as a social worker in 1991. He has practiced in the fields of substance misuse, mental health, homelessness and learning disability.

Since coming to the university in 2000, Jez has specialised in practice near research using participatory and community engagement methodologies. He has managed programmes of work with a range of so called 'hard to reach' communities including:

  • Black and minority ethnic groups
  • Faith groups, including Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh and Buddhist groups
  • Refugees and asylum seekers
  • Lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgendered groups
  • Travellers
  • Older people
  • Offenders
  • Mental health service users
  • Substance misusers
  • People with learning disabilities
  • Such programmes have taken place in a number of different domains including substance misuse, mental health, the prevention of violent extremism, regeneration and the reduction of health and social inequalities.

Jez also manages a network of seldom heard groups (SpeakOut) on behalf of the Care Quality Commission (see www.speakoutnetwork.org)

Professor Chris Heginbotham - Associate
Chris is Emeritus Professor of Mental Health Policy and Management, University of Central Lancashire, Visiting Professor, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, University of Cumbria and Honorary Professor, Institute of Clinical Education Medical School, University of Warwick. He was deputy Head/Acting head of International School for Communities, Rights and Inclusion at Uclan and has held Chief Executive Posts in a number of National Organisations including MIND and the Mental Health Act Commission. He is fellow of RSPH, has a particular interest in public health, mental health and within it, in values based practice and social commissioning.

Steve Broome - Associate
Steve Broome provides research, evaluation, and social innovation expertise. His main interests are in community development, social networks, mental wellbeing, substance misuse, criminal justice, and local economic development. He was Director of Research at the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) for six years and set up the organisation’s Connected Communities programme, testing social network and asset-based approaches to community development and public services, and developing methods for mapping and mobilising relationships and assets within communities. He also set up the RSA’s Whole Person Recovery programme, a service user centred commissioning model and programme for recovery from substance misuse.

Steve previously worked in community regeneration, running community development, evaluation and strategy, and community safety and crime reduction programmes for a London-based New Deal for Communities partnership. Prior to this, Steve worked for several economic development consultancies for a range of national government, local government, quango, third sector, and corporate clients. His projects included social and economic impact assessments for several regional public health groups.
He studied mathematics at undergraduate level, and both social research and local/regional economic development at postgraduate level. He is the co-author of What’s Normal Anyway?, a book published by Constable & Robinson which explores the lived experience of various mental health problems. He is an Associate and a Fellow at the RSA, and is a visiting lecturer in research methods at Greenwich University.

Additional Information

For further information please contact:
Prof. David Morris, Centre Director - dmorris1@uclan.ac.uk
11-13 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0AN Tel: 0207 307 2448

Ellen Dobson
Research and Business Administrator
Brook Hub, Brook Building Room 204, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE
edobson@uclan.ac.uk
Tel: 01772 894364 (Direct Line)

Tel: 01772 891992 or 01772 891993 (Reception)
Brookhub@uclan.ac.uk

Related Projects

  • Mental health
  • Dementia capable cities
  • Connected communities in Higher Education
  • Connecting people’s development
  • H&WBB and CCG development

List of programmes since 2013:

  • Connected Communities
  • Connecting People
  • Kirklees
  • Odessa
  • Orbit
  • Harpurhey
  • PHT Supporting Community Conversations (Anonymised)
  • MIND Personalisation Research
  • Dementia Friendly Communities – as part of the Prime Minister's Champions Group and the Civil Society working group