Navigation

News and events

Lecturer in contention for one of journalism’s highest honours

Rachel Atkinson

Clare Sambrook has made the journalism category longlist of the Orwell Prize  

Journalist Clare Sambrook, who lectures part-time at UCLan, has been longlisted for the highly prestigious Orwell Prize.  

An award-winning journalist who teaches at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) is in contention for one of journalism’s highest honours.

Clare Sambrook has been longlisted for the second time in the highly prestigious journalism category of the Orwell Prize for her work in exposing injustice, challenging official lying, and providing intelligence and ammunition to people working for policy change.

In addition to her work at UCLan, Clare is a novelist, freelance journalist and a founder of the citizens’ campaign End Child Detention Now. She is a co-editor of Our Kingdom, the UK section of openDemocracy where she edits the Shine A Light project.

“I’m absolutely delighted to have made the Orwell Prize longlist for the second time in three years - it’s a real honour."

Clare said: “I’m absolutely delighted to have made the Orwell Prize longlist for the second time in three years. It’s a real honour to be in such strong company on the list, and I’m delighted that Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi, whose work I publish, is there too.”

Her submission exposes waste, greed and dishonesty in the privatisation of public services. For “The racist texts; What the Mubenga trial jury was not told” Clare dredged inquest transcripts to gather violent racist material that was found in possession of two of the three G4S guards who were cleared of the manslaughter of Jimmy Mubenga.

Her scoop, “Nice work: G4S wins $118 million Guantánamo contract”, was followed by The Daily Telegraph, Guardian, Independent, and the Daily Mail, and provoked a complaint from Reprieve to the UK government.

Clare is one of 15 journalists who have made it on to the longlist and will find out on 21 April if she has been selected for the shortlist of six.

Clare is no stranger to acclaim for her writing. In 2010 she won both the Paul Foot Award and Bevins Prize for Outstanding Investigative Reporting.

She is one of 15 journalists who have made it on to the longlist and will find out on 21 April if she has been selected for the shortlist of six.

The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing. Every year, prizes are awarded for the work which comes closest to George Orwell’s ambition ‘to make political writing into an art’. The Prize was established in its present form by the late Professor Sir Bernard Crick in 1994, ‘to encourage writing in good English – while giving equal value to style and content, politics or public policy, whether political, economic, social or cultural – of a kind aimed at or accessible to the reading public, not to specialist or academic audiences’.