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Dental hypnosis wins national award

28 April 2015

Rosie Lulat

 

UCLan’s Nicola Allison scoops the British Society of Clinical and Academic Hypnosis undergraduate award

A dental student from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) is celebrating after being awarded a specialist undergraduate prize.

Nicola Allison, who is in her final year of the Bachelor of Dental Surgery course, won the British Society of Clinical and Academic Hypnosis (BSCAH) student prize for her essay which provides a brief history of hypnosis, some background into how it works and some techniques that are useful in dentistry. The essay also describes different uses of hypnotherapy in dentistry and some suggestions for how to raise awareness of the technique and how to promote dentists to undergo the training.

 

"I am really looking forward to learning clinical hypnosis, the opportunity to do the course will enable me to add an excellent skill to my growing dental repertoire.”

The 25 year-old entered the competition after receiving a lecture about hypnotherapy. She said: “Winning the prize was a great surprise. I am really looking forward to learning clinical hypnosis, the opportunity to do the course will enable me to add an excellent skill to my growing dental repertoire.”

Nicola will receive £100, and a free place on the BSCAH foundation course. The course may contribute towards a university accredited diploma in clinical hypnosis. She will also have the chance to present the essay at the society’s next annual gathering in May 2016.

Nicola, from South Wales, is currently undergoing her clinical training at UCLan’s Dental Education Centre in Blackpool. She will begin a foundation job after graduation in West Wales, starting in September.

 

“The skill of hypnosis is a great tool to have within dentistry, it can be used to relieve anxious patients, help with behaviour changes and even can be used to achieve a level of anaesthesia."

She said: “The skill of hypnosis is a great tool to have within dentistry, it can be used to relieve anxious patients, help with behaviour changes and even can be used to achieve a level of anaesthesia. Moreover, the course may lead to a diploma which will look great on my CV and puts me in good stead for further postgraduate training and eventually, hopefully specialising.”

Dr Michael Capek, the Development Officer of British Society of Clinical & Academic Hypnosis (BSCAH), and supervisor for the prize essay commended Nicola for her award. He said: “Writing and winning the first prize is not to be underestimated. The competition is open to any undergraduate or postgraduate student on a health related course. This includes medical, dental, and psychology students and any student studying a health care profession. Teaching on the topic in undergraduate curricula is minimal so students are having to construct the essay from a very low base of initial knowledge and experience. In the opinion of the judges, Nicola’s essay, although focusing entirely on dentistry, was the one within the remit of the title that produced the best overall balance in terms of both depth and breadth.”