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Office for Fair Access approve University plans

16 July 2015

Chris Theobald

UCLan makes bold financial commitment to attract and support students from disadvantaged areas

The Office for Fair Access (OFFA) has today highlighted ambitious proposals the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) has made to attract students from disadvantaged areas and then support them through their studies.

In 2016-17 over 24% of UCLan’s student fee income (between 6-£9,000) has been earmarked for student access initiatives. By 2019-20 the University estimates it will allocate:

  • £726,000 on access activities. This includes long-term sustained outreach work, which identifies learners at an early stage, and helps to raise aspirations and attainment
  • £3.115 million on work to support students through their studies – for example through tailored induction programmes for particular groups of students
  • £1.105 million on progression activities, to ensure that students are well prepared for life after graduation
  • £3.878 million on financial support, including bursaries, fee waivers and hardship funds.

“UCLan’s institutional access agreement published by OFFA continues to show the University excelling when it comes to helping people from all walks of life to make the most of their potential.”

Pro Vice-Chancellor Dr Lynne Livesey said: “UCLan’s institutional access agreement published by OFFA continues to show the University excelling when it comes to helping people from all walks of life to make the most of their potential.

“Over 19% of our students come from low participation neighbourhoods which makes us a leader in the field.

“Of course it’s not just about attracting students into higher education but also focusing on positive graduate outcomes. At UCLan a core element of our strategy is to offer all students the opportunity to gain some paid work experience.

“Over the last two years this policy has paid off as we have increased the percentage of those in graduate level work or further study, within 6 months of completion, by nearly 8%.

“Over 19% of our students come from low participation neighbourhoods which makes us a leader in the field.”

“Overall our employment rates are high, over 92% of full-time students are in employment or further study six months after graduation which rises to 98% for part-time students.
“We are now looking to continue this upward trend and are working alongside employers in the development of our curriculum and real-world experience through degree study.”

Professor Les Ebdon, Director of Fair Access to Higher Education, added: “Eroding the stubborn link between your background as a child and your life chances as an adult is a long-term project. But I am confident that this set of agreements can – and will – make a real and lasting difference for many years to come.

“The outreach work universities have planned will open the door to higher education for people who might otherwise have thought it was not for them. The people that universities work with now will go on to be the doctors, business leaders and engineers of the future.”