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Are you protected against meningitis, measles and mumps?

17 Feb 2020

vaccination with hypodermic needle

Read the latest MMR and MenACWY vaccination advice

Meningitis

Meningitis is a killer and the virus can be easily contracted in locations such as university campuses where large numbers of people are likely to be living and studying together in close proximity. Young adults are particularly at risk and this contagious disease can lead to brain damage, scarring, organ damage, loss of sight/hearing and limb loss due to septicaemia.
All students going to university for the first time, who have not had the MenACWY vaccination by the time they arrive at UCLan should arrange to have it as soon as possible after arrival. It’s free to any young person up to the age of 25 and the best protection you can have against the disease.
Meningitis and septicaemia: information for new university entrants.
Further information about the vaccination is available on the NHS website.

Measles

A recent increase in measles cases across England and reports of outbreaks in Europe means ensuring your MMR vaccinations are up to date is a smart thing to do. Measles is caused by a very infectious virus resulting in skin rashes, high fevers and the possibility of serious complications in adults. Teenagers, young adults and anyone who has missed their MMR vaccination can get measles.
The MMR vaccine is available free to anyone who has not received both doses as a child – if you’re not sure, check with your GP and arrange to be vaccinated if you’re not already.
Read the leaflet – Think Measles - it’s not just a kids problem.
Further information about the vaccination is available on the NHS website. 

Mumps

Additionally, England is seeing a significant increase in cases of mumps, with many of the cases occurring in university students.
We're recommending that you check your immunisation history and, if you haven't had two doses of the MMR vaccine, arrange to be immunised as soon as possible by speaking with your GP.
Mumps is a contagious viral infection, most recognisable by the painful swellings in the side of the face under the ears (the parotid glands). Other symptoms of mumps include headaches, joint pain and a high temperature, which may develop a few days before the swelling of the parotid glands. Most people recover without any special treatment, but in rare cases, there can be serious complications such as inflammation of the testicles in males, meningitis and deafness.
Mumps is spread in the same way as colds and flu: through infected droplets of saliva that can be inhaled or picked up from surfaces and transferred into the mouth or nose. So regular hand hygiene can help protect you from the infection.
Learn more about mumps on the NHS website.

MMR vaccine

The MMR vaccine is available free to anyone who has not received both doses as a child – if you’re not sure, check with your GP and arrange to be vaccinated if you’re not already.
Further information about the vaccination is available on the NHS website.