Dr. Stefano Barone

Sociology lecturer

School of Law and Social Science

Livesey House, LH307

sbarone@uclan.ac.uk

Stefano Barone is a Sociology lecturer. His research focuses on youth cultures and popular music: in particular, he has been working on the heavy metal, electronic, and rap music scenes in post-revolutionary Tunisia. He has published a book and several papers on this topic, both in English and French. At UCLan, he teaches an array of subjects, from the Sociology of Youth, to methodology, to the Sociology of Media.

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Stefano Barone is a Sociology lecturer. He holds a Master’s degree in cultural Anthropology from the University of Siena (Italy) and a PhD in Sociology from Griffith University (Australia).

His research focuses on youth cultures and popular music: in particular, he has been working on the heavy metal, electronic, and rap music scenes in post-revolutionary Tunisia. He is interested in the way youth cultures and popular music scenes become glocalised in non-western contexts. He identified the Tunisian case as a particularly relevant one, since the political processes of “democratisation” that followed the Arab Springs redesigned the possibilities of music-making and the political and social role of music scenes in the country.  Also, heavy metal, rap, and electronic music interact in complex ways with the changing social and cultural dynamics of Tunisia: they are embedded in the debate on national culture, and the role Islam has on it, and express the complexities of the local social structure.

Stefano’s monograph, titled “Metal, Rap, and Electro in Post-Revolutionary Tunisia. A Fragile Underground” was published by Routledge in 2019. Besides, he has published several papers on this topic, both in English and French, and regularly participates in international conferences on youth culture, popular music, and African/Middle Easter Studies.

At UCLan, he teaches an array of subjects, at BA (including Foundation) and MA levels, from the Sociology of Youth, to methodology, to the Sociology of Media. He also supervises BA dissertations.

Publications

Barone, S. (2019) Metal, Rap, and Electro in Post-Revolutionary Tunisia: A Fragile Underground. Oxon/New York: Routledge. 
Barone, S. (2019) Electronic Dunes and Downtown Vibes. The Social Construction of an Underground Electro Scene in Tunisia, Popular Music and Society,  DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2019.1565627 
Barone, S. (2017) Feeling so Hood. Rap, lifestyles and the neighbourhood imaginary in Tunisia, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, 46/1 (2019), 88-103.  
Barone, S. (2015) Fragile scenes, fractured communities: Tunisian Metal and sceneness, Journal of Youth Studies, 19/1 (2016) 20-35.  

Teaching activities

BA: 

  • HUC110 Essentially Study Skills for Higher Education (module tutor)
  • HUC111 Developing Academic Knowledge (module tutor)
  • SO1004 Media and Society (module tutor)
  • SO1114, Doing Social Research (module leader)
  • SO1115 Youth Identity and Difference (module tutor)
  •  SO1116 Sociological Ways of Thinking (module tutor)
  • SO3020 The Sociology of Childhood (module leader)

MA:

  • RB4005 Conceptually-based Research (module tutor)

Conferences 2019

  • World Metal Congress, London, 22-23 March. Panel: “United Forces”
  • SESAMO (Italian Society for Middle East Studies) Conference. University of Turin, 31 January – 2 February. Panel convenor (“Rethinking Resistance in Middle Eastern Popular music”). Paper: “Save your life. Resistance, discipline, and the political economy of Tunisian rap”

Conferences 2018

  • Séminaire: « Productions et circulations des biens culturels : le cas des pays du Moyen-Orient et de l’Afrique du nord », Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Paris, 15 November. Paper : « Musique Underground et construction du social dans la Tunisie post-révolutionnaire : les cas des scènes Metal, Rap et Electro »
  • Rocking Islam Conference, University of Freiburg, 27-29 September. Paper: “Metal and Islam in Tunisia. Revolution, (Ir)religiousness, and the Identity Debate”
  • BRISMES (British Society of Middle Eastern Studies) Conference, King’s College London, 25-28 June. Paper: “Pop Culture and Marginality in Tunisia: the case of Heavy Metal and Electronic Music Scenes”.