Navigation

Resource Hub

Athena Swan

Health and Wellbeing

Recognising advancement of gender equality: representation, progression and success for all.

ECU’s Athena SWAN Charter was established in 2005 to encourage and recognise commitment to advancing the careers of women in science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine (STEMM) employment in higher education and research.

In May 2015 the charter was expanded to recognise work undertaken in arts, humanities, social sciences, business and law (AHSSBL), and in professional and support roles, and for trans staff and students. The charter now recognises work undertaken to address gender equality more broadly, and not just barriers to progression that affect women.

ECU’s Athena SWAN Charter covers women (and men where appropriate) in; academic roles in STEMM and AHSSBL, professional and support staff, transgender staff and students in relation to their representation, progression of students into academia, journey through career milestones and working environment for all staff.

Development opportunities

The programme aims to enable women in academic and service roles to think of themselves as leaders and to develop leadership skills and strategies for working in the higher education environment.

Faculty of Health and Wellbeing Self Assessment Team

 

Name Specific Role Personal comments
Helen Byfield Professional Adminstrative and Support Staff Forum I am a Clerical Assistant in the Research Support Team and work full time.  I have caring responsibilities for both of my parents who are in their eighties.
Jackie Coupe Faculty Athena SWAN Survey group I am a full time Research Associate in the Faculty Research Support Team.  I have supported my three children through full time Higher Education.
Alison Doherty Postgraduate Research Student Forum I am studying for a funded PhD in tackling health inequalities.  I have caring responsibilities for children and parents.
Jean Duckworth Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum I am a full time Senior Lecturer, having moved between full and part time employment to meet changing family responsibilities.  I have balanced this with recently completing a PhD, while supporting my children through Higher Education.
Simone Finley Professional, Administrative and Support Staff Forum I am a full time Senior Administrative Research Officer in the Research Support Team having recently been made permanent and progressed from fixed term junior roles.
Sarla Gandhi Undergraduate Student Forum; School Executive Team I am from an Asian/BME background and was recently promoted to the role of full time Principal Lecturer for Academic Development within the School of Nursing.  I balance this role with my carer responsibilities of parents and parents-in-law through the flexibility of managing my workload.
Robert Graydon Student Experience Committee I am a full time lecturer in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics. The role has required flexibility to develop my career alongside my studies as well as accommodating my role as a single parent.
Janette Grey iTrent data group I am the full time Management Information Officer linked to the Faculty. I have supported my daughter and son through Higher Education and have had caring responsibilities for a parent.
Stephen Hall iTrent data group I am full time in my role as Faculty Academic Development Director. I have benefited from flexible working to support my parenting role and fulfil caring responsibilities for family members with significant health problems.
Nigel Harrison Faculty Executive Team I am the Executive Dean of the Faculty and work full time.  I live with my husband and I have caring responsibilities for a 91-year-old parent.
Rebecca Hewitson Marketing and recruitment group; iTrent data group

I am the full time Human Resource Manager linked to the Faculty.  I have balanced this role with parental responsibilities and post graduate study.

Ivan McGlen Student Experience Committee I am a full time Senior Lecturer in Nursing.  I am married with three children and balance this while undertaking a part time PhD.  I have appreciated the support of colleagues in a phased return to work following a period of illness.
Mick McKeown Induction and staff development group I am a nurse, trade unionist and full time Reader in Democratic Mental Health. I am a parent and have cared for my parents with dementia.
Claire Meadows-Haworth University Athena SWAN website group; iTrent data group I work full time as the university Athena Swan and Equality Officer and link with the Faculty. I have been supported while challenged with a medical condition and disability.
Hazel Roddam Gender-sensitive mentoring group I was promoted to Reader in Allied Health in the last year. I am married and balance work with supporting my 80-year-old parents and my daughter with 2 pre-school children. I have been supported in an extended phased return to work after a serious illness and my ongoing need for flexible working due to my health condition.
Grete Smith Early Career Researchers’ Forum I am a full time Project Officer. In the past, I have balanced this role while undertaking postgraduate study at UCLan. I live with my husband who is self-employed and have a good work life balance, augmented by voluntary community work.
Debi Spencer Appraisal and staff development group; Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum; Postgraduate Research Student Forum I am a full time Senior Lecturer in the School of Health Sciences and am undertaking a professional Doctorate. I am married and supported my son while undertaking a Higher Education course and have caring responsibilities for a parent.
Lois Thomas Project Manager; Professors’ and Readers’ Forum I am a Reader in Health Service research. I have always worked part-time to accommodate childcare responsibilities as my husband works for IBM in Dubai. My daughter is now at university and my son works in London.
Leona Trimble Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum I am full time Academic Team Leader for Sports Coaching and Management in the School of Sport and Wellbeing, while undertaking a Professional Doctorate. I achieve a work life balance through shared household responsibilities with my husband.
Hayley Tyrer Professional, Administrative and Support Staff Forum I am a full time Business and Operations Manager for the Lancashire Clinical Trials Unit and Research Support Team on a fixed term contract. I live with my partner and have no children.
Leena Vinod Induction and staff development group I am a full time Lecturer for Adult Nursing in the School of Nursing and I come from an Asian/BME background. I have 2 young children and a supportive husband. Over the years, I have grown in my professional standing and responsibilities. The flexible working pattern at UCLan has enabled me to balance work, study and personal life.
Caroline Watkins Appraisal and career development group I am Professor of Stroke and Older People’s Care and the Faculty Director of Research and Innovation and work full time. I am married and had a young baby when I joined UCLan. He was premature requiring flexible working to allow care and hospital attendance. He is now a teenager with ongoing support needs.
Karen Whittaker Professors’ and Readers’ Forum I was recently promoted to Reader in Children and Family Health. I am married with two children who I am supporting through Higher Education. I have benefited from secondment into other universities and health visiting networks.
Debbie Wisby Gender-sensitive mentoring group; Student progression and attainment group I am the Faculty Director of Business Development and have completed a professional doctorate while employed full time. I have support to reduce my working hours temporarily to enable me to undertake family caring responsibilities in my role as a new grandparent.

Events

Inaugural Athena SWAN lecture by Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell
Friday 27 April 2018

On 27th April 2018, we had the pleasure of hosting Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell’s Athena Swan Inaugural Lecture, here, at the University of Central Lancashire.

The fact that at the time, we did not know what the outcome of the application we submitted in November 2017 took nothing away from the experience of being inspired by an outstanding female leader and academic!

In front of a packed audience consisting of staff from the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, staff from other Faculties within UCLan, students and other guests, Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell took us on her journey from a young scientist to becoming President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Manchester.

Nancy Rothwell

Throughout Professor Dame Rothwell’s lecture, we found out a lot more about how research is not always plain sailing and about the role that perseverance plays in achieving research outcomes. Of course, add a degree of serendipity, and the outcomes you get, might be somewhat different from what you hypothesised or expected to get. Changes in direction, however, can be stimulating, refreshing and invigorating and can have a career advancing effect, despite being seemingly very difficult.

Professor Dame Rothwell mentioned the importance of media exposure through being provided the opportunity to share the excitement of science with younger generations, and the early career opportunity as a Royal Society Research Fellow. Both of these were acknowledged not only as stepping stones in early career, but also, as summit vantage point when becoming an accomplished academic. The example of the young girl in a picture in 1998 after a TV programme, and then in 2011, the picture of the same young girl graduating with a Chemistry degree brought home the importance of inspiring young people and engaging with a wide range of audiences.

All of us in the audience wanted to know the ‘how’. How do you progress to the top of the profession? How do you continue and excel at being at the top of your chosen field? And Professor Dame Rothwell was generous with tips which have guided her career and would support the flourishing of most people, within or outside of academia.

To say that the lecture was a tour de force would be quite accurate – the research and academic achievements of Professor Dame Rothwell cannot be understated. The inspiration associated with seeing such power and stamina in leadership and academia left us all thinking about and seeking hidden reservoirs of possibility within ourselves.

There could have been no better person to tell us so powerfully, yet humorously and grounded at the same time about the potential of women – all before our Athena Swan journey has even begun. The inaugural lecture was the inspiration needed and the springboard to harness and nurture potential within the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing.

Case Studies

Karen Whittaker (Image)

Karen Whittaker

My life journey and interest in Health Visiting started with my degree from Manchester where I qualified as both a Nurse and a Health Visitor. I had not expected to attend University, it was not a path that my all girls’ school had ever suggested. Read more about Karen's story.

My life journey and interest in Health Visiting started with my degree from Manchester where I qualified as both a Nurse and a Health Visitor. I had not expected to attend University, it was not a path that my all girls’ school had ever suggested. Read more about Karen's story.

Ivan McGlen (Image)

Ivan McGlen

I was told that I had picked up “a funky virus on your travels.”  Professor Solomon, Consultant Neurologist, said the virus had come and gone quickly and was either chikungunya (pronounced chik-en-gun-ye) or haemorrhagic dengue. Read more about Ivan's story.

I was told that I had picked up “a funky virus on your travels.”  Professor Solomon, Consultant Neurologist, said the virus had come and gone quickly and was either chikungunya (pronounced chik-en-gun-ye) or haemorrhagic dengue. Read more about Ivan's story.

Debbie Wisby (Image)

Debbie Wisby

If I had my time to do again I would choose nursing as a career. I always wanted to be a nurse.  Going to University was not something my school even thought about as an option for me.  My working class parents supported my ambitions and were proud to see me in my nurse’s uniform. Read more about Debbie's story.

If I had my time to do again I would choose nursing as a career. I always wanted to be a nurse.  Going to University was not something my school even thought about as an option for me.  My working class parents supported my ambitions and were proud to see me in my nurse’s uniform. Read more about Debbie's story.