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Mental Health and Wellbeing

Our underlying commitment is to ensure that UCLan research brings benefit to patients and vulnerable people, who are diagnosed, supported and cared for, or at risk, because of mental health needs.

Mental Health and Wellbeing

Overview

Through research UCLan aims:

  • To raise the profile of mental health-related research at UCLan by promoting collaborative work between academics, professionals in health and social care, service users, carers and the wider community
  • To increase the quality and breadth of research on mental health at UCLan by developing the capacity and capability of researchers and research partners
  • To form a better understanding of the nature of mental health, illness and recovery and the conflicting demands on good mental health and social care. This is achieved through high-quality research, development and consultancy that span a number of themes.

The key aims of this research group are;

  • To ensure the profile of mental health related research is raised and that collaborations are formed between multi-disciplinary academic, professionals in health and social care, service users, carers and the wider community.
  • To increase the quality and breadth of research on mental health at UCLan by developing the capacity and capability of researchers and our academic, clinical and research partners.
  • To form a better understanding of the nature of mental health, illness and recovery and the conflicting demands on good mental health and social care.
  • To develop knowledge, explore insights and generate solutions that will improve the provision of mental health services and the evidence-based interventions provided within them.

Our aims are achieved through high-quality research, development and consultancy that span a number of broad areas.

  1. Participation, co-production and democracy in Mental Health
  2. Evidence-based Interventions in Mental Health
  3. Philosophy and Mental Health
  4. Mental Health and Criminal Justice
  5. Arts, Heritage and Mental Health

Mental health researchers make an integral contribution to university-wide interdisciplinary work, notably exemplified within the two Institutes, the Lancashire Research Institute for Global Health and Wellbeing and the Lancashire Research Institute of Citizenship, Society and Change, and other centres of research endeavour such as: the UCLan Criminal Justice Partnership, the Centre for Citizenship and Community.

Within this research theme we pride ourselves on interdisciplinary perspectives and the involvement of practitioner, service user and community partners.  We especially value patient and public involvement (PPI) in all our research endeavours and the inclusion of people with lived experience of mental health, service use and carer experiences.

We adopt and have experience and expertise in using a variety of robust research methodological approaches including: quantitative, qualitative and health research.

Our activity brings together interested and active parties who focus their research endeavours in the field of mental health and wellbeing across the lifespan, critique of aspects of standard mental health care and exploration of alternatives.

We are committed to providing a focus for research and research leadership in mental health across the University and promotion of a co-ordinated and collaborative approach both within UCLan and with external partners.

A key aspect of our research involves working with vulnerable people and communities, mental health in aging populations, coercion and safety, service user involvement and partnership working including advocacy.

To find out more about research in Mental Health and Wellbeing, contact Professor Mick McKeown:

Tel: +44 (0)1772 893884
Email: mmckeown@uclan.ac.uk
Twitter: @UCLanMH #UCLanMHResearch

We will report updates on current projects we are involved in via twitter.

Impact

A key area of impact focuses on service users’ and carers’ experiences including the funding of a Community Engagement and Service User and Carer Support project, which attracts international recognition. We provide advice, support and training for mental health service user researchers.

Our ‘Whittingham Lives’ project and bringing together a community of people to investigate and learn from the historical accounts of mental health care hence having a direct local impact but learning that will have a much wider impact.

Our philosophers led on the Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry.

We run the world’s only distance learning programme in Philosophy and Mental Health. A text book edited by two of our mental health professors (Wright and McKeown, 2018) has brought together an impressive collection of leading mental health contributors to provide a comprehensive and current ‘essentials of mental health nursing textbook.

We examine conceptual and evaluative complexities at the heart of mental healthcare. Current Projects include:

A review of the quality of independent mental health advocate services, funded by the Department of Health
Conceptualisations of mental wellbeing by black and minority ethnic communities in Scotland
A review of medical theories on restraint-related deaths in the UK, funded by the Ministry of Justice.

We are leading innovators in the understanding of people with personality disorder co-morbidity who present to primary care services and involved with the British and Irish Group for the Study of Personality Disorder (BIGSPD).  We have the UKs longest running and only Personality Disorder specific MSc training programme.

We are an ambitious team, who are keen to ensure that we work with partners from a range of professional backgrounds and would welcome contact from nationals / international collaborators to explore the possibility of joint working opportunities in which we can develop research bids that will ultimately contribute to improving the provision of services, patient and carer experiences and evidence based approaches for people with mental health difficulties. Making a positive and meaningful impact to research knowledge in mental health care is integral to our work.

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