University supports Hate Crime Awareness Week with ‘Cake not Hate’

 University supports Hate Crime Awareness Week with ‘Cake not Hate’ Banner Image

UCLan Students’ Union hosts ‘Cake Not Hate’ event to promote ‘Yes to Respect’

UCLan Students’ Union hosts ‘Cake Not Hate’ event to promote ‘Yes to Respect’

UCLan has hosted a series of key events this week to support Hate Crime Awareness Week, including a ‘Cake not Hate’ event this Thursday to help promote awareness of the ‘Yes to Respect’ campaign. 

The event was held in the main Students’ Union Atrium on Fylde Road; and in addition to encouraging students, staff and local residents to enjoy delicious cake, also promoted important messages regarding the need to tackle sexual harassment, Hate Crime and on-line harassment.

The initiative marked the culmination of a series of events during the week at the University aimed at raising awareness of Hate Crime.

This has included a Hate Crime awareness training session and a community activities day at the Tom Finney Sports Centre dedicated to the memory of MP Jo Cox.

Thursday’s Cake Not Hate event particularly focused on the Union’s support for the ‘Yes to Respect’ campaign and looked to raise awareness of the Students’ Union 3rd party reporting centre on campus, which allows UCLan students and staff to report hate crime incidents confidentially.

Many hate crimes and incidents tend to go unreported, so this week is about having discussions and developing our understanding of what we mean by Hate Crime.

Suntosh Kaur, Students’ Union President said: “In our society, we should all feel safe to be our authentic selves. Many hate crimes and incidents tend to go unreported, so this week is about having discussions and developing our understanding of what we mean by Hate Crime. It’s important that anyone can report a Hate Crime, even if you’re a bystander.”

One of the events staged on the campus has included a public lecture titled ‘Perspectives on Hate Crime’, which included first person testimonies from individuals who had experienced hate crime incidents themselves.

British Red Cross representative Modupe Ainenehi, who spoke of her own experience of hate crime at the lecture, said:

“Experiencing hate crime can be a very distressing experience for someone but it is important not to allow it to overwhelm you. It is important for everyone not to be brought down by hate crime.”

Staff, students and local residents have a right to be safe and feel safe, irrespective of their race, religion, disability, sexuality, gender identity or lifestyle choices.

Linda Tompkins, UCLan’s Equality, Diversity, Inclusion and Communities Manager said :

“Staff, students and local residents have a right to be safe and feel safe, irrespective of their race, religion, disability, sexuality, gender identity or lifestyle choices. 

“Hate has no place in Lancashire and UCLan continues to work closely with our local partners, particularly with the Students’ Union, Lancashire Constabulary and Preston City Council to tackle Hate Crime and Hate Incidents.”

 

Press Office | 16 October 2019