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Dr. Amina Ferraz

Lecturer in Pharmaceutics

School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences

Maudland Building, MB240

+44 (0) 1772 89 5835

aferraz@uclan.ac.uk

Subject Areas: Pharmacy

Dr Amina Ferraz is a lecturer in Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences. She graduated from UCL School of Pharmacy, University of London with an MPharm in 2003 before completing a PhD in Pharmaceutical Science at the same school. She worked as a senior pharmaceutical scientist at Pfizer before joining UCLan and is a fully registered pharmacist. She is experienced in the field of development, scale-up, process validation and technology transfer of inhaled formulations.

Amina is research active within the area of pharmacy and biomedical sciences and is a member of the Drug Design, Analysis and Delivery Research Group.

Full Profile

Dr Amina Ferraz is a lecturer in Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences with a clinical pharmacy background and industrial experience.

She graduated in Pharmacy from UCL School of Pharmacy, University of London, with an MPharm degree before completing a PhD in pharmaceutical science, in collaboration with AstraZeneca, at the same school. Her PhD work involved the production of a stable pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) system, which forms a drug carrier upon delivery from the pMDI.

She then worked at Pfizer, as a senior pharmaceutical scientist, where she was responsible for the development of new inhaled products; including the development of novel dry powder inhaled products and progressing them to Phase I / Phase II studies and coordinating clinical trials. She became experienced in development, scale-up, process validation and technology transfer of inhaled formulations, including device-based products. She has a broad pharmaceutical background in areas of: formulation development, materials science and manufacturing.

She is also a fully registered pharmacist working closely with other healthcare professionals to develop new and existing services in line with the needs of the patients and providing outstanding care, with a real passion for improving their therapy and quality of life.

Publications

Alouache, A.I., Kellaway, I.W., Taylor, K.M.G., Rogueda, P., (2006). Effect of Fluoroalcohol on Product Performance in PEG-Phospholipid-Containing Pressurised Metered Dose Inhalers. Journal of Aerosol Medicine, 20: 372.

Alouache, A.I., Kellaway, I.W., Taylor, K.M.G., Rogueda, P., (2006). Stability Kinetics of HFA Suspensions Prepared with a Fluoroalcohol and PEG-Phospholipids. Journal of Aerosol Medicine, 20: 373.

Alouache, A.I., Kellaway, I.W., Taylor, K.M.G., Rogueda, P., (2006). Controlled-Release Colloids Generated From Budesonide Pressurised Metered Dose Inhaler Solution Formulations. Journal of Aerosol Medicine, 20: 372.

Qualifications

PhD, Pharmaceutical Science, UCL School of Pharmacy, University of London, in collaboration with AstraZeneca, 2007.

MPharm, Pharmacy, UCL School of Pharmacy, University of London, 2003.

Memberships

A registered pharmacist with the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC)

Member of University and College Union (UCU), UK

Projects

Respiratory Drug Delivery

Teaching Activities and Responsibilities

Lecturer in various Pharmaceutics modules both at undergraduate (MPharm) and postgraduate levels (MSc).

Module leader for:

Physical Pharmacy, PJ1101, 1st year MPharm.
Pharmaceutical Technology and Formulation Development, BL4218, MSc module.

Lecturer in:

Pharmaceutical Regulation, Clinical Trials and Pharmacovigilance, BL4219, MSc Industrial pharmaceutics.
Practical techniques in Industrial/Medicinal Chemistry, BL4217, MSc Industrial pharmaceutics.
Advanced Drug Delivery, PJ4100, 4th Year MPharm and MSc Industrial pharmaceutics.
Drug Development, PJ4101, 4th year MPharm.
Dosage Forms 2, PJ2101, 2nd Year MPharm.

Research

The lung is the target organ for the treatment of local respiratory diseases and is a potential administration route for systemic treatments, which makes it an attractive organ for drug delivery. However, pulmonary delivery is a complex and challenging process, as it requires a safe and efficacious drug, a carrier system, the design and engineering of a device and its correct use by the patient.

Amina's research interests within the pulmonary drug delivery area are twin-tracked; She is interested in drug targeting using liposomal pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) and (dry powder inhaler) DPI systems, and inhaled formulation ex vivo investigations.

Pulmonary drug delivery of liposome-entrapped drugs can prolong drug residence in the respiratory tract which may prolong the therapeutic effects within the lung and reduce systemic side effects. Unfortunately, liposomes as aqueous dispersions are very unstable and are difficult to manufacture on a large scale when formulated by the conventional method. Therefore her work aims at entrapping drugs within spontaneously formed liposomes in vitro and within the aqueous environment of the respiratory tract in vivo, and achieving a controlled release profile as a means for drug targeting using liposomal pMDIs and DPIs.

Many patients use their inhaled therapy incorrectly achieving variable lung deposition. Specifically, patients with asthma and COPD do not achieve best use of their inhalers. Some patients cannot breathe strongly enough to release the drug and others struggle to handle the device. The difference between an ‘effective’ and less effective aerosolisation profile in terms of airway penetration remains to be investigated, and it is unknown what the correct formulation/device combination is for patients therefore Amina is interested in studying the relationship between in vitro / in vivo data, understanding patient parameters, inter-patient variability for passive DPIs, and developing a better understanding of the interaction between formulation, device and patient.