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Dr. Andrew Levidis

Lecturer

School of Language and Global Studies

alevidis@uclan.ac.uk

Subject Areas: Languages and International Studies, History

Dr Andrew Levidis is a historian of modern Japan and East Asia, whose work focuses on political history, history of international relations, and the modern historiography of war. Dr. Levidis's research focuses on Japanese politics and diplomacy in the 1930s, history of civil-military relations in prewar Japan, interaction of war and society since the nineteenth century, and the historical foundations of conservatism. In particular his research examines Japanese army factionalism in the 1930s, and the relationship between the transformation in the shape of war, and changes in domestic politics and supreme command from World War I to the 1940s.

Full Profile

Dr Andrew Levidis is a historian of modern Japan and East Asia, whose work focuses on political history, history of international relations, and the modern historiography of war. He received his Ph.D. in History from Kyoto University, and has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University (2014-2015), Lecturer in the History Department at Harvard, and a Fellow in the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard (2015-2016). Before joining the school, he was a Research Associate Fellow in Modern East Asian History at the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies at Cambridge, and a member of the ERC Project "The Dissolution of the Japanese Empire and the Struggle for Legitimacy in Postwar East Asia." 

Dr Levidis is currently completing work on his manuscript which focuses on modern Japanese conservatism through the life and career of Kishi Nobusuke (1896-1987), one of the founders of the Liberal Democratic Party, and premier (1957-1960) during one of the most tumultuous periods of modern Japanese history. This work fills the historiographical gap that has surrounded Kishi’s prewar and wartime career, and examines the roots of Japanese conservatism in the interwar era. Specifically it explores the depths of conservative reaction in the 1920s and 1930s, Kishi's role as one of the architects of Japan’s mobilization state and his ties to military officers, and the neglected continuities between Japan’s prewar and postwar rightwing. 

Qualifications

  • Ph.D. History, Kyoto University, 2013
  • BA. University of Melbourne, 2005 
     

Membership

  • American Historical Association (AHA)
  • Association of Asian Studies (AAS)