Navigation

Safety, Health and Environment

Guidance and Procedures

This page contains guidance and procedure documents covering safety and health published by the SHE Section.

A-Z list of safety, health and environment guidance and procedures
On this page you will find all of the Guidance documents and other information provided by the SHE Section.

Please use the alphabetical list below to find and select the information that you require. We have listed documents under their main and alternate headings and acronyms to help you find what you are looking for. For example information about work with computer screens is listed under VDU or Visual Display Unit and DSE or Display Screen Equipment.

Accident Reporting

Accidents, incidents, injuries or near misses on campus to a student, visitor, contractor or other person not employed by UCLan should be reported immediately to the SHE Section on 01772 89(2067).

An Accident Report form should also be completed and returned to the SHE Section, Vernon Building, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE.


Control of Substances Hazardous to Health

COSHH (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002) (.docx 17.9 Kb)

COSHH Risk Assessment Form Guidance (.doc 42KB)

COSHH Single Substance Risk Assessment Form (.doc 92KB)

COSHH Multi Substance Risk Assessment Form (.doc 80KB)

COSHH requires employers to control exposure to health from hazardous substances to protect both employers and others who may be exposed from work activities. Employers must be aware of what hazardous substances are used in the workplace and the associated risks to health, precautions and controls must then be put in pace. Employers must ensure that employees are properly trained and/or supervised when dealing with hazardous substances.


Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres

The specific legal requirements of the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR) 2002 were introduced for new workplaces on the 30th June 2003. Workplaces in use before this date had to comply with the regulations by the 30th June 2006.

DSEAR requires employers such as the University to assess the risk of fires and explosions that may be caused by dangerous substances in the workplace. These risks must then be eliminated or reduced as far as is reasonably practicable. The aim is to protect staff and other people who may be put at risk, such as students, contractors and visitors to the workplace.

Procedural Guidance for the Control of Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres (.doc 266 Kb)

This procedural guidance must be applied to all University workplaces and activities which contain or use dangerous substances. The following examples illustrate the types of activities undertaken using dangerous substances that may be covered by DSEAR.


E +

Emergency Egress Plans

SHE section have developed three Generic Emergency Egress Plans (GEEPs) for persons who have mobility, visual or hearing impairments. School disability co-ordinators issue one of the relevant GEEPs to a student when they receive the ‘electronic notification’ from the disability team (Student & Academic Support Service)..

The GEEPs should be issued as follows:
Disability Code:
H - Mobility Impairment Emergency Egress Plan (.docx 52.1Kb)
C - Visual Impairment Emergency Egress Plan (.docx 17.2Kb)
D - Hearing Impairment Emergency Egress Plan (.docx 36.0Kb)


Emergency Plan

Emergency Management Plan


Event Safety Management

There has been a considerable increase in the number of staff and student organised events occurring both off campus and on University premises over the last few years.

Many are organised and run by staff as part of their normal duties, but a significant number are now organised by students as part of their course of study.

The SHE section has therefore developed two procedures for the management of events one for on-campus and a second for off-campus events. They offer practical advice to help consolidate the event management process related to a number of UCLan procedures and processes and are intended to take you through a step-by-step process to assist you in complying with legislation to help ensure your own and your attendees health, safety and welfare.

The procedures are intended to cover events such as exhibitions, speakers, awards ceremonies, music, dance, theatre or stage performances, charity concert, variety show or ball, race nights, fashion shows, cake sales, raffles, beauty product demonstrations, themed nights, talent nights, comedy shows, etc., which are open to staff, students and members of the public whether free of charge, for charity or for commercial gain.

FM SHE 058 Procedural Guidance for the Management of Staff or Student Organised Events on the Preston Main Campus (.docx 131 Kb)

FM SHE 059 Procedural Guidance for the Management of Staff or Student Organised Events Held Off-Campus (.docx 133 Kb)

Separate copies of forms contained within the procedures:

On-Campus Event Template Risk Assessment (.docx 46.2 Kb)

Off-Campus Event Template Risk Assessment (.docx 42.5 Kb)

Off-Campus Event Health & Safety Venue Assessment Checklist (.docx 33.1 Kb)

Interim Guidance on Charity Cake Sales (.docx 104 Kb)

Interim Guidance on Running Raffles, Poker Tournaments, Lotteries, etc., as part of an event (.docx 42 Kb)

Staff and Volunteer Code of Behaviour Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults (.docx 26 Kb)


Expectant Mothers

The University of Central Lancashire recognises its legal and moral obligations to new and expectant mothers at work. (.docx 61.4 Kb) This guidance outlines the procedures to be followed by managers when an employee provides notice that they are pregnant.

Pregnancy should not be regarded as an ill health condition as it is a natural aspect of life. Some hazards in the workplace may affect the health and safety of new and expectant mothers or of their child(ren) resulting in aspects of work becoming unacceptable during pregnancy or whilst breastfeeding. Health and safety issues related to pregnant workers can normally be adequately addressed by existing management systems and procedures already in place within the University that control risk. Pregnancy will not in most cases, prevent women from continuing to work in a safe, healthy and productive way.


Eye Tests and DSE Risk Assessment

Guidance and DSE checklist

The latest form for carrying out a DSE Assessment can be found by following this Link to the DSE checklist (.doc 166 Kb)

The current guidance on Display Screen Equipment from the SHE Section can be seen by following this Link to the DSE Guidance (.docx 122 Kb)

Practical DSE Advice - Online

Please try this online DSE assessment tool from Learning Link


Field trips and Educational Visits

The following guidance documents set out University procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during field trips, fieldwork and general educational visits. They are based primarily upon the University's legislative duties identified from statute and case law, sector best practice and guidance from advisory bodies such as the Health and Safety Executive, Universities UK, DfEE, etc.

UK Field Trips
Procedural guidance (.docx 203 Kb) for the management of health and safety on UK field trips, fieldwork and educational visits.

This document is applicable to all University field trips, fieldwork undertaken as part of a course of study or research whether in an urban or rural environment and educational visits such as visits to museums, art galleries, theatres, concert performances, factory tours, farms etc.

Overseas Field Trips
Procedural guidance (.docx 180 Kb) for the management of health and safety on overseas field trips and educational visits (link to document)


Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment

The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) and its associated Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) replace existing legal requirements relating to the use of lifting equipment. The Regulations aim to reduce risks to people's health and safety from lifting equipment provided for use at work. The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) 1998 apply to all work equipment including lifting equipment but LOLER applies over and above the general requirements of PUWER in respect of all lifting equipment.

A Guide to the Safe Use of Lifting Equipment Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations(LOLER) 1998 (.doc 122 Kb)

Failure to comply with the requirements of LOLER is a criminal offence and liable to lead to enforcement action or prosecution by the Health and Safety Executive.


Hazardous Substances

Many hazardous substances are used within the University. They range from chemical, radiological and biological agents used in laboratory experiments to cleaning and fumigation substances. Instances may occur where people are exposed to these hazards, for example, while working on contaminated equipment, breaking into pipe-work or in an area where these substances are in use. The risks of exposure need to be controlled. This procedure details the safe systems of work to be followed in order to prevent injuries to people resulting from uncontrolled contact with hazardous substances.

Procedural guidance for protection from hazardous substances

This guidance applies to all hazardous substances used on University premises that pose a risk to employees, contractors, students, visitors and members of the public.

The following documents may also apply to activities involving hazardous substances;

Safe Storage of Hazardous Substances (.docx 157 Kb)

Safe Storage of Hazardous Substances Appendix 1- Appendix 1(.doc 236 Kb)

Lone working

Safety at work is a dual responsibility for both employer and employees. The actions required to safely manage workplace hazards are contained in the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 and are enshrined within the common law ‘duty of care’.

Lone working is undertaken by a range of University employees and contractors, (including postgraduate students), either by virtue of their working hours, remote location or methods of working. The basic principle to be applied is that such workers should not be exposed to any greater residual risk than other employees and this may require additional control measures to be identified and implemented.

Lone working guidance for all employees (.docx 144 Kb)

The principal aim of the guidance is to ensure that all University employees are aware of the potential hazards and risks associated with lone working, their individual roles and responsibilities in preventing danger to themselves and others and, to outline the practical steps that can be taken to minimise the risks to their safety. Each lone working situation will be different and it is not envisaged that all aspects of this guidance need be applied for every situation. Risk assessment should determine the level of control required to reduce the risk to an acceptable level.


Manual handling

Accidents involving manual handling are commonplace. The links below give some useful advice on preventing accidents and injuries associated with manual handling

Manual handling lifting code (.pdf 178 Kb)

HSE webpages related to Manual Handling;

Manual Handling Assessment, Backpain, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Ergonomics 


Noise at work regulations guidance

The Control of Noise at Work Regulations (.doc 108 Kb) 2005 came into force on the 6th April 2006 repealing the Noise at Work Regulations 1989.


Provision and Use of Work Equipment

The Provision and Use of Workplace Equipment Regulations (PUWER) 1998 and its associated Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) replace a number of former legal requirements relating to the use of a variety of work equipment. The Regulations aim to reduce risks to people's health and safety from equipment provided for use at work. PUWER applies to all work equipment including lifting equipment but the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) applies over and above the general requirements of PUWER in respect of all lifting equipment.

A Guide to the Provision and Use of Workplace Equipment Regulations (PUWER) 1998 (.docx 70.1 Kb)

Failure to comply with the requirements of PUWER is a criminal offence and liable to lead to enforcement action or prosecution by the Health and Safety Executive.

Private Vehicles (Use for work) Guidance

Procedural guidance for the management of health and safety for overseas travel
Overseas travel requires additional advance planning, care and common sense. It should be noted that travel abroad may expose staff to a number of health and safety hazards arising specifically from the travel itself and/or the conditions within the country being visited. These may not be necessarily directly work-related.

The procedural guidance for the management of health and safety for overseas travel sets out University procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during overseas staff travel. It is intended to assist you in complying with relevant University procedures, the law and offers practical advice to help ensure your health, safety and welfare. It is applicable to all overseas travel undertaken by staff on University business, research etc.

A generic risk assessment template for staff overseas travel has been developed to assist staff in risk assessing their own travel arrangements. Note: Not all of the hazards or controls listed on the template will be relevant to each specific trip and will require to be deleted as appropriate.

Generic staff overseas travel risk assessment template

Procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during UK travel
Many University employees use their own vehicles or hire/pool vehicles as part of their work activity. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) has stated that nationally driving is the most dangerous work activity that most people do. Research indicates that about 20 people are killed and 250 seriously injured every week in crashes involving someone who was driving, riding or otherwise using the road for work purposes.

The procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during UK travel sets out University procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during UK staff travel. It is intended to assist you in complying with relevant University procedures, the law and offers practical advice to help ensure your health, safety and welfare. It is applicable to all UK travel undertaken by staff on University business, research etc.
Note: This document does not apply if you only use your own vehicle to commute to and from your usual place of work, though you may find the safety information useful.

In many cases a generic travel risk assessment may be appropriate. This should cover all staff travel in the school/service on an annual basis, providing the information contained within it is appropriate to the intended travel, is suitable for the work activities to be undertaken and is disseminated to all those planning work related travel.

Example Generic UK Travel Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment


School Visits to UCLan

An increasing number of school pupils visit the University’s campuses every year as part of an organised school trip. The following guidance document is intended to help staff within the University ensure such visitors have a safe and enjoyable experience

The University has a statutory ‘duty of care’ under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 to protect, so far as reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of its staff, students and others, such as teachers and pupils on school trips, while they are on our premises or affected by our activities.

Procedural Guidance for School Visits to UCLan (.doc 107 Kb)

As the visit will likely include young persons, defined by the HSE as “anyone under 18 years of age” or children below the minimum school leaving age (<16), the University has an enhanced duty of care towards them.

Student Work and Study Placement Overseas Travel Info (.doc 811 Kb)


Student Dress Code policy (.docx 23.4 Kb)

Student Placements

Student Placements in the UK and Overseas
The following guidance documents set out revised University procedural guidance for the management of health and safety for student placements based in the UK and overseas.

FM SHE 012 Procedural Guidance for the Management of Health & Safety for UK Student Work Placements (.docx 2.3 Mb)

FM SHE 012a Procedural Guidance for the Management of Health & Safety for Overseas Student Work Placements (.docx 1.9 Mb)

The procedures outline the use of a formal structured management system based upon risk profiling of placements, assessment of providers and pre-placement preparation of students.
They are applicable to all UK and overseas based student placements arranged either by a member of University staff, or by the student themselves, where that placement is part of the student’s course of study. The exception to this may be placements related to professional practice placements such as nursing, teaching, social work placements where specific contractual arrangements may already be in force.

This guidance is based primarily upon the University's legislative duties identified from statute and case law, sector best practice and from new sector guidance issued by the Universities & Colleges Employers Association (UCEA), HSE and ASET.

If you are unsure as to whether this guidance is directly applicable to you please, contact the University’s Safety, Health & Environment (SHE) Section for further advice on (01772 89) 2232.


Thermal Comfort

Thermal comfort is defined in British Standard BS EN ISO 7730 as: ‘that condition of mind which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment.’

The term ‘thermal comfort’ describes a person’s psychological state of mind and is usually referred to in terms of whether someone is feeling too hot or too cold. Thermal comfort is difficult to define as a range of environmental and personal factors must be taken into consideration when deciding what will make people feel ‘comfortable’.

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) (2005) has stated that the “best that you can realistically hope to achieve is a thermal environment that satisfies the majority of people in the workplace, or put more simply, ‘reasonable comfort’. The HSE considers 80% of occupants as a reasonable limit for the minimum number of people who should be thermally comfortable in an environment”.

The University’s Safety, Health & Environment (SHE) Section receives numerous complaints from members of staff concerned with the thermal comfort within their working environment. The vast majority of these have centred upon what they believe to be ‘unacceptably high temperatures’ within their offices. Guidance on these issues can be found below.

Guidance on Thermal Comfort Issues (.docx 63.1Kb)


Travel

Overseas travel requires additional advance planning, care and common sense. It should be noted that travel abroad may expose staff to a number of health and safety hazards arising specifically from the travel itself and/or the conditions within the country being visited. These may not be necessarily directly work-related.

The Procedural Guidance for the Management of Health & Safety for Overseas Travel (.docx 128 Kb) sets out University procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during overseas staff travel. It is intended to assist you in complying with relevant University procedures, the law and offers practical advice to help ensure your health, safety and welfare. It is applicable to all overseas travel undertaken by staff on University business, research etc.

A generic risk assessment template for staff overseas travel has been developed to assist staff in risk assessing their own travel arrangements. Note: Not all of the hazards or controls listed on the template will be relevant to each specific trip and will require to be deleted as appropriate.

Generic staff overseas travel risk assessment template

FCO and Red24 Travel Safety Advice

Advice regarding the Zika Virus

UK Travel

Many University employees use their own vehicles or hire/pool vehicles as part of their work activity. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) has stated that nationally driving is the most dangerous work activity that most people do. Research indicates that about 20 people are killed and 250 seriously injured every week in crashes involving someone who was driving, riding or otherwise using the road for work purposes.

The Procedural Guidance for the Management of Health & Safety during UK Travel sets out University procedural guidance for the management of health and safety during UK staff travel. It is intended to assist you in complying with relevant University procedures, the law and offers practical advice to help ensure your health, safety and welfare. It is applicable to all UK travel undertaken by staff on University business, research etc.
Note: This document does not apply if you only use your own vehicle to commute to and from your usual place of work, though you may find the safety information useful.

In many cases a generic travel risk assessment may be appropriate. This should cover all staff travel in the school/service on an annual basis, providing the information contained within it is appropriate to the intended travel, is suitable for the work activities to be undertaken and is disseminated to all those planning work related travel.

Example Generic UK Travel Risk Assessment (.docx 40.9 Kb)


Working At Height (including Ladders and Step Ladders)

The SHE Section has published the following guidance documents relating to safety whilst working at height.

General Working at Height Guidance
Working at height is always a high-risk activity. Falls are the largest cause of accidental death in the construction industry and need to be avoided by provision of suitable access equipment being properly used. High safety standards are essential for all working at height and the nature of the precautions required must be assessed for each individual job. This procedural guidance sets out responsibilities, precautions and provides general guidance for good practice relevant to all working at height.

Procedural Guidance for General Working at Height (.docx 107 Kb)

This procedural guidance applies to all working at height on University premises (excluding roof access/roof work – see separate procedural guidance).