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UCLan student captures Preston pub history in biro

26 June 2015

Becki McGeorge

Artist Danielle gives life to derelict pubs through detailed pen drawings  

A University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) student has created a series of detailed drawings of some of the derelict pubs in Preston using only a biro pen.

Danielle Shore, a 21-year-old drawing and image making student from Skipton, found inspiration for her final year project when she noticed the number of old, closed pubs in the Preston area.

"I collected old photographs from the archives, looked at the Lost Pubs Project and I also got in touch with Stephen Halliwell, a local historian."

She commented: “I became aware of the amount of closed pubs when I was cycling around Preston; there used to be one on almost every corner. It was sad to see all of these boarded up buildings that would have been hubs of a community back in the day. I did a lot of research into the history of the places for my project. I collected old photographs from the archives, looked at the Lost Pubs Project and I also got in touch with Stephen Halliwell, a local historian who wrote a book about Preston Pubs.”

Inspired by the works of biro artist Mark Powell and conceptual artists Hilla and Bernd Becher, Danielle’s exhibition Last Orders reflects the damaging consequences to society caused by the upheaval of communities.

The student spent approximately 200 hours combining elements from historical photographs with modern images of how the shells of the buildings appear today. Her completed exhibition comprises of 10 different drawings including portraits of The Avenham Park, The Cricketers Arms and The Queen Vic.

“I consider these drawings to be an act of preservation, they allude to a life passed, solitary and removed from their context, almost becoming icons.”

“The final drawings depict each pub in the final stages of its ‘living’ self, layered with elements from its history,” Danielle said. “I consider these drawings to be an act of preservation, they allude to a life passed, solitary and removed from their context, almost becoming icons.”

She continued: “I like that when you first look at all of them together you might think that they were the same but each one is very different. They work as a whole. Together they make more of an impact, with less focus on each individual portrait.”

After graduation next month, Danielle hopes to create a similar set of portraits on local pubs in Skipton, Yorkshire. Learn more about Danielle’s work here.