Navigation

News and events

University of Central Lancashire to host 21st Century Human for inaugural Humanities Festival

14 May 2014

Lyndsey Boardman

Researchers and public explore what it means to be human

The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) is hosting an event to participate in Being Human, the UK’s first national festival of the humanities, which involves discussion, debate, public lectures, workshops and opportunities to meet researchers, made possible by a grant from the festival organisers, the School of Advanced Study, University of London, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.

Following a successful application, UCLan has been awarded funding to hold the event during Being Human festival week, 15 – 23 November 2014. 21st Century Human will champion the excellence of humanities research being undertaken in Preston and help to demonstrate the vitality and relevance of this today.

Selected from over 100 applications, the grant will help the university bring together researchers and the local public to engage with their own interpretation of the humanities. 21st Century Human will be part of a national programme of activities which aim to inform, extend and ignite contemporary thinking and imagination around the humanities.

“We plan to take research off the University Campus, and out to our local community, and are looking forward to working with partners to achieve this.”

Dr Jo Heaton-Marriott, UCLan’s Public Engagement Manager, said: “We are really excited to be part of this national event. We’ve had success with the Lancashire Science Festival and hope that 21st Century Human can become a similar annual event in the University calendar. We plan to take research off the University Campus, and out to our local community, and are looking forward to working with partners to achieve this.”

Currently in its first year, Being Human is led by the School of Advanced Study in participation with the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Academy with the participation of arts and cultural organisations and universities across the UK.

The festival programme will focus on activities that make humanities research accessible to the general public and demonstrate the role of the humanities in the cultural, intellectual, political and social life of the UK.

Thirty-six grants have been awarded to universities and arts and cultural organisations across the UK to participate in the nine days of festival events taking place across the UK, from Truro to Orkney, Swansea to Belfast and Norwich to Liverpool.