Navigation

News and events

UCLan historian brings temperance memories to life

20 February 2014

Lyndsey Boardman

Book shares stories of teetotal movement which started in Preston

The popularity of a local exhibition charting the temperance movement has prompted a University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) historian to write a book sharing the stories of those who were teetotal.

One of the features of the 2012 Preston Guild was the temperance history exhibition on the top floor of St George’s Centre, which proved extremely popular with passing shoppers and visitors.

It showcased photographs from the movement, regalia used by temperance enthusiasts, pledge cards and examples of popular magazines published at the time as well as drinks from Britain’s last surviving temperance bar, Fitzpatrick’s in Rawtenstall.

“This book is in response to the questions and comments of members of the public who wanted to learn more about their local and family traditions. It also makes a fascinating story.”

Now the UCLan historian who set it up has written an illustrated book with more stories of those who were teetotal. Demon Drink? Temperance and the Working Class uses nearly 100 photographs, drawings, and magic lantern slide images to explore why so many people took the pledge to avoid alcohol, and the impact this movement had on society.

Author Dr Annemarie McAllister said: “This book is in response to the questions and comments of members of the public who wanted to learn more about their local and family traditions. It also makes a fascinating story.”

The city’s temperance movement, which required members to sign a pledge of abstinence, was started by Joseph Livesey of Walton-le-Dale in 1832 and was a very popular crusade in the nineteenth and twentieth century, particularly in the North West.

Demon Drink? Temperance and the Working Class is available from Amazon Kindle store, so it can be read on computers, tablets and Kindle readers, and because of this format is selling at just over £3 – around the price of a pint of beer. Richly illustrated with examples from UCLan’s Livesey Collection of temperance history, it explores an important aspect of Lancashire’s heritage.