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UCLan casts spotlight on male victims of partner violence

14 November 2013

Chris Theobald

World-leading researcher joins real victims for a day of shared experiences

A world-leading researcher specialising in male survivors of partner violence has given a public talk on the subject at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan).

In recognition that domestic violence can happen to men too with figures indicating that men in the North West suffer the highest rate of any area in England and Wales with a higher prevalence that women, Dr Denise Hines from Clark University Massachusetts, USA headlined UCLan’s Male Victims Event Day.

As part of UCLan’s Distinguished Visitor Programme, the day included a discussion of Dr Denise Hines’ research around ‘understanding and helping male survivors’.

“We are delighted to welcome all our participants to this special day which include solicitors, the police, prison workers, psychologists, NHS staff, academic researchers and students."

The day also included first-hand accounts of two male victims one of whom, Ian McNicholls, assisted Coronation Street scriptwriters with Tyrone Dobbs’ abusive relationship storyline.

Dr Nicola Graham-Kevan, a research expert in partner violence from UCLan’s School of Psychology, said: “We are delighted to welcome all our participants to this special day which include solicitors, the police, prison workers, psychologists, NHS staff, academic researchers and students. Dr Hines brings a wealth of research experience which centres on issues of family violence, understanding and helping male survivors and establishing research links with policymakers and practitioners.

"Society is largely blind to women's aggression. People often won't believe that men are victims. Men have to be seen as passive, obvious victims with clear injuries, whereas, if a woman makes allegations, they are believed much more easily."

"Society is largely blind to women's aggression. People often won't believe that men are victims.”

The most recent British Crime Survey found that only 10 per cent of male victims of domestic violence had told the police, compared with 29 per cent of women. More than a quarter of male victims tell no one what has happened to them, compared with 13 per cent of women.

Presentations from key help support agencies such as Preston Domestic Violence Services discussed their experience of providing support for male victims within a traditional domestic violence service.

Margaret Gardner, Director of the False Allegations Support Organisation, presented a talk entitled: The Hidden Victims, covering the false allegation area both with regards to criminal and family matters.

AMIS (Abused Men in Scotland) discussed its experiences of working with fathers in Scotland, some of the barriers to abused men receiving appropriate support and the challenges to service providers and policymakers. AMIS unveiled research which examines men’s experience of child protection.