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World’s first reggae poet is coming to Preston

UCLan set to welcome poet and activist Linton Kwesi Johnson

A world-renowned poet and activist is heading to The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) to share some of his award-winning work.

Jamaican-born ‘dub poet,’ political orator, musician and journalist Linton Kwesi Johnson (LKJ) will read his poetry at the University’s Media Factory on Saturday 14 October.

LKJ is regarded as the world’s first reggae poet and his musical recordings are amongst the biggest selling reggae albums in the world.

Dr Yvonne Reddick, Research Fellow in Modern English and World Literatures from UCLan’s Institute for the Black Atlantic Research, said: “LKJ is the leading dub poet in Britain whose history of political activism is legendary, so it’s a real honour to invite him to the University to share his work.

“The reggae rhythms of LKJ’s band accompany his powerful poetry. Everyone will want to get up and dance to the beat. His words carry an inspiring message of freedom and equality. Preston is in for a treat.”

The poet’s visit to Preston is part of The Red and the Black: The Russian Revolution and the Black Atlantic Conference organised by the Institute for the Black Atlantic Research to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution.

LKJ is remembered as a former member of the Black Panthers, a black nationalist and socialist organisation that began in the US in the mid-1960s, and developed his work with Rasta Love, a group of poets and drummers.  LKJ’s first collection of poetry, Voices of the Living and the Dead, was published in 1974 by Race Today and in 2002 he became only the second living poet and the first black poet to have his work included in Penguin’s Modern Classics series, under the title Mi Revalueshanary Fren: Selected Poems.

The cultural evening with Linton Kwesi Johnson will take place on Saturday 14 October at 8.00pm at UCLan’s Media Factory.  Tickets are available at Ticket Source: https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/386462

Lyndsey Boardman | 18 September 2017