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Police chief gains academic recognition

03 December 2014

Rachel Atkinson

Lancashire’s top police chief has been recognised for his service to the red rose county by the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan).

Chief Constable Steve Finnigan collects Honorary Fellowship from University of Central Lancashire.

Lancashire’s top police chief has been recognised for his service to the red rose county by the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan).

UCLan conferred an Honorary Fellowship to Lancashire Constabulary’s Chief Constable Steve Finnigan CBE QPM at a graduation ceremony in Preston’s Guild Hall on Tuesday afternoon.

He received his award in recognition of his contribution to the community. After leaving school with good grades, the Liverpudlian started his working life as a bank clerk. He soon realised it was not the career for him and nine months later he joined Merseyside Police. He then spent 25 years working his way up the ranks from Constable to Chief Superintendent. During his time with the force he was involved in many significant events including the Toxteth riots, the Miners’ Dispute and the murder of James Bulger.

During his distinguished career he continued with his education. In 1992 he was awarded an honours degree in History by St John’s College, Cambridge. He studied at the University after winning a scholarship and in 1996 received a Master’s Degree from Cambridge.

"With him in charge, Lancashire was the only force among 43 to be awarded an ‘excellent’ grade by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary."

In 2001 the football fan joined Lancashire Constabulary as Assistant Chief Constable and he was promoted to Deputy Chief Constable 18 months later. By February 2005 he was temporarily appointed as Chief Constable and his role was made permanent two years later.

With him in charge, Lancashire was the only force among 43 to be awarded an ‘excellent’ grade by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary in 2006 for its approach to neighbourhood policing and criminal justice. The following year, Lancashire was judged to be the joint top performing force in the country.

In 2006 he was awarded the Queen’s Police Medal (QPM) and that was followed in 2010 with the honour of a Commander of the British Empire (CBE). Both awards came in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for his services to policing.

During the prestigious Winter Degree and Award Ceremonies 1,500 students, who have studied at a combination of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctorate levels, collected their awards in front of family and friends.