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Chemistry students’ research published in international journal

01 July 2014

Rachel Atkinson

Four MChem students undergraduate research has been featured in Tetrahedron Letters

Dean of the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences Dr Allison Jones, Stephen Grieve, Gary Peczkowski, Laurie Crouch, Holly Maloney and Dr Rob Smith, Senior Lecturer in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry.

Four undergraduates from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) have had their scientific research published in a highly specialised international journal.

The MChem Chemistry students’ work, involving creating and analysing new ‘greener’ compounds, has featured in Volume 55, Issue 22 of the high impact publication Tetrahedron Letters.

Stephen Grieve, Gary Peczkowski, Laurie Crouch and Holly Maloney, who are all set to graduate from the four year course this July, are among a very select group of undergraduates who have had their research published while still studying at this academic level.

"It’s awesome and really energising to know our undergraduate research has been published in such a prestigious chemistry journal"

Their work, entitled ‘A rapid, chromatography-free route to substituted acridine–isoalloxazine conjugates under microwave irradiation,’ formed part of their final year project.

Laurie, 26, from Thornton, said: “It’s awesome and really energising to know our undergraduate research has been published in such a prestigious chemistry journal. We’re all really proud of our achievements and it’s a great asset to have on our CVs, especially as we’re about to enter the world of work.”

Dr Rob Smith, Senior Lecturer in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry, was the students’ tutor on this project. He said: “It’s a phenomenal achievement for these four students to have been published in such a global industry publication. They’re among our first graduating MChem cohort and it’s such an accomplishment that currently half of the first group are leaving with their work in a publication.”

To read the research visit Science Direct