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Local student creates artwork with psychological twist

16 June 2015

Lyndsey Boardman

Juliette inspired by Freud for final year sculpture  

A Barnard Castle student has taken inspiration from famous psychologist Sigmund Freud to create an intricate forest-like sculpture that represents the conscious and subconscious mind.

Fine artist Juliette Moore, who is due to graduate from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in July, has created a tall wooden structure for people to peer into through a small hole and then strangely submerge themselves into what seems to be a much larger forest-like space thanks to the clever use of reflective mirrors.

The 21-year-old wanted to create something that challenges human defence mechanisms and our perception of space as well as inviting viewers to interact with her artwork.

 

“I did a lot of research into Freud’s theories of the conscious and unconscious mind. The outer wooden box represents the conscious mind, whereas the inside of the box signifies the unconscious mind.”

Juliette said: “I did a lot of research into Freud’s theories of the conscious and unconscious mind. The outer wooden box represents the conscious mind whereas the inside of the box, the forest structure, signifies the unconscious mind which is a big expanse of space and much more primitive.”

The six foot tall sculpture is Juliette’s final year piece of work and has taken her several months to construct. The box itself is made from plywood with the detailed work inside of the lid. Juliette had hand-made more than 30 trees from wire and sat them on acrylic grass and clay. The fine art student then stuck reflective plexiglass and hand-made periscopes to the inside of the lid to make the scene seem bigger and to disorientate the person looking through the peep hole.

 

“I hope that when people look through the hole it makes them feel a bit confused and like they have entered another world momentarily."

Juliette commented: “I hope that when people look through the hole it makes them feel a bit confused and like they have entered another world momentarily. I’m really pleased with the overall piece and how it’s all come together.”

The former Teesdale School and Sixth Form Centre pupil also takes her inspiration from Portuguese artist Sancho Silva who is known for his manipulation of space and inviting visitors to physically explore his work. Juliette intends to continue with her art after leaving University with long-term ambitions to work in a museum.