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Law with Criminology

Law with Criminology LLB (Hons)

UCLan’s LLB Law with Criminology provides you with the opportunity to obtain a qualifying law degree whilst also gaining an awareness of current issues in criminology. By studying these complimentary subjects side by side you will ensure that you have the academic training required to pursue a career within the legal sector or within a wide range of other professions.

You will be taught by highly qualified staff from within Lancashire Law School and by renowned and extensively published criminology academics. You will gain an awareness of current legal issues and of current issues in criminology – debates surrounding criminal justice, social control and the role of the police. The course covers all of the core law modules required for a qualifying law degree as well as considering both the nature of crime and criminality and society’s response to it.

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The Criminology element to the programme provides academic study of the nature of crime, criminality and responses to crime in contemporary society. It considers how crime is defined, perceived as a problem, and managed in modern society.

The aim of the course is to offer the opportunity for intellectual development, to acquire fundamental legal knowledge for progression into the legal profession, the wider employment market or further study and to provide flexibility in developing specialised interests.

A significant feature of Law study in the Lancashire Law School is the emphasis from the outset on relevant legal and transferable skills, including research, oral and written, e-communication and critical reasoning skills, advocacy, personal development planning and group work. We adopt a wide range of learning and teaching methods, designed to support you to develop as an independent learner. These include interactive online sessions, e-learn activities, workshops, reflective clinical legal education, group work, research exercises, presentations, mooting and debating as well as the more traditional seminars and lectures. You will have more structured class contact in Year 1 of your programme to support your transition to Higher Education.

In the course of study core and optional modules in both subjects are offered to allow you to acquire the range and depth of knowledge and skills appropriate to their own needs and ambitions in a supportive and friendly environment. In particular, the programme includes a module dedicated to the necessary research, interviewing and negotiating skills needed to succeed in law professions.

You will be supported in finding legal placements and have numerous opportunities to visit relevant legal establishments, both locally and beyond. In Year 2 you are able to visit many of the European Institutions during a week-long study tour in Brussels.

Law students in Moot Court


Our Professors usually teach on the course so students get to hear first-hand about ground-breaking research topics such as war crimes trials, women in prison, criminal law.


The approach to teaching and learning is 'student-centred': this means responsibility for achieving learning outcomes is placed on student initiative in self-managing their own programme of study. Staff facilitate this process by providing students with appropriate learning materials and support, such as module handbooks, lecture outlines, reading lists and online student support, with students being encouraged to adopt an independent approach to learning through effective use of private study time in researching information and responding to tasks and questions.

Law students


Lancashire Law School is at the cutting edge of research in a number of specialist legal areas including investigations into crime and criminal justice. Over 50% of research is classed as internationally significant or world leading. Our externally funded projects have included looking at an Alcohol Policy for Europe, Hate Crime in Europe and International War Crimes. There are opportunities for you to contribute to research projects through intern schemes.


Our lecturers are from both academic and professional backgrounds ensuring our commitment to research informed teaching is maximised. You will be taught by leading academics and by staff who are professionally qualified as solicitors and barristers hence giving you a sound understanding of substantive law and its practical application.

You will benefit from expert teaching by renowned and extensively published academics in the criminology field. For example, Helen Codd spoke at the International Hate Crime Conference in Brussels.

You can join the Student Law Society, which is run by students for students, and has arranged events such as trips to London to visit the Supreme Court, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Old Bailey, a Law Ball and numerous guest speakers.

Each year we organise a dedicated law careers fair which is supported by the Crime Prosecution Service (CPS) and legal professions and placement providers from throughout the North West.

Law students

Why study this course?

The programme is an excellent starting point if you’re thinking of a career with a specific criminological interest, such as the probation service, social work, youth and community work, the police, prison and immigration services.

Key Information

  • Duration:

    Full-time: Three years, Part-time: five-six years

  • Level:

    Undergraduate

  • Delivery:

    Campus, Full-time and Part-time

  • Award Type:

    LLB (Hons)

  • UCAS Code:

    M191

  • Campus:

    Preston (Campus code: U)

  • Start Date:

    September

  • Fees 2018/19

    Full-time: £9,250* per year (UK/EU)
    Part-time: £1,540* per 20 credits studied (UK/EU)

  • View 2017/18 Fees

Scholarships and Bursaries

The University offers a range of scholarships and bursaries to support you through your studies.

Discover More

Entry Requirements

Our typical offer is 112 UCAS Points. We operate a flexible admissions policy and treat everyone as an individual. This means that we will take into consideration your educational achievements and predicted grades (where applicable) together with your application as a whole, including work experience and personal statement. General Studies accepted 

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit
BTEC Diploma: Distinction* Distinction*
Pass Access Course: with 112 UCAS points
International Baccalaureate: Pass Diploma with 112 UCAS points from Higher Level Subjects
IELTS: grade 6 with no score lower than 5.5
GCSE: 5 GCSEs at grade C/4 including Maths and English or equivalent 

Personal Statement Advice

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Advice & Guidance

Course Overview

Year 1

Compulsory Law Modules

  • Lawyers Skills and Personal Development
  • The Law of Contract
  • Public Law
  • Legal System

Compulsory Criminology Modules

  • Key Thinkers in Criminology
  • Crime and Society

 

Year 2

Compulsory Law Modules

  • Legal Research and Reasoning and Personal Development
  • Criminal Law
  • EU Law
  • The Law of Torts

Optional Law Modules

  • Human Rights in the UK
  • Criminology
  • Family Law
  • Media Law
  • Medicine and the Law
  • Sentencing and the Treatment of Offenders
  • Sports Law
  • Employment Law

Optional Criminology Modules (students must choose at least 1)

  • Prostitution, Infanticide & Punishment in the Nineteenth Century
  • Media & Crime
  • Drugs & Crime
  • Understanding Policing
  • Critical Thinkers in Criminology
  • Youth Justice and Young People
  • Understanding Personal Violence
  • Victims, Communities & Crime
  • Offending Corporations
  • Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Year 3

Compulsory Law Modules

  • Interviewing, Employability and personal development
  • Land Law
  • Equity and Trusts

Optional Law Modules

  • Company Law
  • Criminal Law Relating to Sex and Violence
  • Criminal Evidence
  • EU Business Law
  • War Crimes Trials
  • Terrorism and the Law
  • Dissertation
  • Project
  • Placement
  • Law Clinic

Optional Criminology Modules

  • Theories of Crime & Punishment
  • Texts in Criminology
  • State Crime and Genocide
  • Why Prison?
  • Sex, Violence and Strategies
  • Developmental Criminology
  • Diversity, Crime and Justice
  • Obeying the Law: Political Obligation
  • Drugs & Society
  • Controversial Issues in Prison
  • Terrorism & Human Rights
  • Crime and New Technologies
  • Human Trafficking

Late Applications

See what we've been up to ...

Tim Owen Senior Lecturer in Criminology, was interviewed by BBC Radio Lancashire about recent cybercrime attacks. Listen Here.


Professional Accreditation

The courses are validated by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board meaning that they are qualifying law degrees. Our LLB provides the academic stage of training should you wish to go on to a career as either a solicitor or a barrister.


Learning environment

The School’s teaching environment is designed to stimulate learning. For large group teaching, we make use of the many modern lecture theatres across campus all of which have state of the art audio visual support and presentation facilities. All small group teaching rooms, contain state-of-the-art audio-visual equipment to enhance and support the learning experience.

As you would expect from a Law School committed to enhancing the employability of its graduates, there are a number of dedicated skills development rooms with recording and play back facilities within the School itself. There is also an impressive moot court room which looks just like a real court and provides students with an invaluable real-life educational experience. The moot court room is also used extensively for extra-curricular activities such as mooting competitions, advocacy training and visiting speakers. The Library contains a dedicated Law Library with a plethora of textbooks, law reports and journals as well as providing a quiet space for students to study both individually and as part of a group. The Law School’s extensive e-law library facility gives access to many legal and academic sources from the UK and beyond and is available to students not just when they are on-campus but whenever they are sitting in front of a PC.

There is a dedicated Blackboard page for each module which provides extensive online support, from module handbooks and lecture outlines to self-test quizzes and interactive revision materials.

Assessment is undertaken in a variety of ways, from the traditional unseen exam (a professional requirement for all of the core foundation modules), to seen examinations; end of module and in-course formative coursework assessments; e-quizzes; e-case studies; group and individual presentations; portfolios; pod casts; personal development reflective diaries; moots and debates and oral performance in seminars.


Opportunities on the course

You can take up a wealth of opportunities for real life work experience and personal skills development, for example, taking part in mooting competitions, undertaking work placements, mini-pupillages and attending Summer Schools.

There is no formal sandwich placement, although there is an optional module in Year 3 where you can spend a period in law related work placements. We have a network of alumni working in large North West organisations that offer placements to our graduates.

You also have the opportunity to study or work abroad, through the Erasmus scheme or via international exchanges and placements. In addition you can gain the benefit of visits, for example, to the European Commission in Brussels, the European Parliament and the European Commission in Luxembourg.

Our students are valued highly by employers due to their aptitude and skills profile. They have an impressive track record of gaining graduate level jobs or professional training contracts. Our graduates are attractive to a range of employers – solicitors, barristers, company legal advisers, football clubs, insurance companies, HR departments, teachers, criminal justice system, courts, probation service, police officers. Lancashire Law School graduate are much sought after in the workplace.

After successfully completing our combined LLB (Hons), you can go on to the professional element of legal training either as a solicitor (the Legal Practice Course) or as a barrister (the Bar Professional Training Course). The programme is also an excellent starting point if you’re thinking of a career with a specific criminological interest, such as the probation service, social work, youth and community work, the police, prison and immigration services.

Some of our eminent alumni include judges, Queen’s Counsel, barristers and solicitors across the UK, Europe and around the world, CEOs, business leaders and industrialists, entrepreneurs and business owners, senior public servants such as civil servants, politicians, senior police and local government officers, senior academics and researchers at all levels, authors of many academic works, leading voluntary sector workers, board representatives and trustees.

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Future Lawyer


Our Industry Links

Lancashire Law School has strong links with the legal profession and with a range of other professional employers and our students enjoy regular visits and talks from leading practitioners, academics, barristers, solicitors and judges. This ensures that the skills which our undergraduates develop are directly relevant to those required by employers.

 

Important Information

Course Handbook

For detailed information about studying this course at UCLan, please see the course handbook for your year of entry: 2017 Entry | 2018 Entry

For information on possible changes to course information, see our Important Information.

* Tuition Fees

*Tuition Fees are per year unless otherwise stated.

Entry Requirements

For changes to 2017 UCAS tariff entry requirements please see our important information. UCLan requires all undergraduate applicants to have a minimum attainment of five GCSEs at grade C and above, or equivalent, (including Maths and English). In 2017 and beyond we will view the new Grade 4 as being equivalent to a C grade and will therefore require students to achieve GCSE Grade 4 or above. However, if the subject is relevant to our degree programme and requires a higher GCSE grade (e.g. GCSE B grade), and/or includes a Professional body that governs the entry requirements, Grade 5 or above may be required.