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Forensic Computing and Security BSc (Hons)

Forensic Computing and Security BSc (Hons)

School of Physical Sciences and Computing

UCAS Code

GF44

Level

Under- graduate

Campus

Preston

Foundation Entry Route

If you do not meet the formal entry requirements specified, Foundation Entry offers an alternative route to study this degree.

Find out more

  • Duration:

    Full-time: Three years, Sandwich: Four years

  • Level:

    Undergraduate

  • Delivery:

    Campus, Full-time

  • UCAS Code:

    GF44; Short form: BSc/FC

  • Campus:

    Preston (Campus code: U)

  • Start Date:

    September

  • Award Type:

    BSc (Hons)

Why study this course?

Combine your interest in solving crimes with computing on this fascinating course which involves detecting, preserving and presenting evidence from computers and mobile devices. You’ll develop an understanding of hardware, operating systems and communications software, attention to detail, creative problem-solving and investigative skills and an appreciation of computer threats and counter-measures and relevant legal issues. Forensic analysts require a high level of technical expertise, an understanding of computer-related crime, an appreciation of relevant law, a methodical approach to investigation, and the ability to explain complex technical ideas simply. The skills you will develop on this course can lead to careers in digital forensic analysis or in systems management and computer security.

Please note this course is running for September 2018 entry

Entry Requirements

If you don't quite meet these requirements, give us a call in Clearing on 01772 830777 – we want to help you!

112 UCAS tariff points at A2 or
BTEC National Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit
AND
5 GCSEs at grade 4 (previously grade C) or above including Maths and English.
Students whose first language is not English must achieve an IELTS 6.0 (with no component score less than 5.)Qualifications equivalent to the above are accepted.

 

For changes to 2017 UCAS tariff entry requirements please see our important information. UCLan requires all undergraduate applicants to have a minimum attainment of five GCSEs at grade C and above, or equivalent, (including Maths and English). In 2017 and beyond we will view the new Grade 4 as being equivalent to a C grade and will therefore require students to achieve GCSE Grade 4 or above. However, if the subject is relevant to our degree programme and requires a higher GCSE grade (e.g. GCSE B grade), and/or includes a Professional body that governs the entry requirements, Grade 5 or above may be required.

Clearing 2017 - Secure your place

Course at a Glance

Year 1

  • Introduction to Networking
  • Computer Systems and Security
  • Computing Challenge
  • Introduction to Programming
  • Interactive Applications
  • Programming
  • Systems Analysis & Database Design

Year 2

  • The Agile Professional
  • Computer Security
  • Digital Evidence and Incident Response
  • Mobile Device Evidence and Investigation
  • Digital Forensic Tools and Standards

One from the following:

  • Advanced Programming
  • Network Management
  • Database Systems

Year 3

  • Digital Forensic Investigation
  • Penetration Testing
  • Computers, Society and Law
  • Double Project

One from

  • Wireless and Mobile Networks
  • Advanced Database Systems
  • Science Communication
  • Internet Application Development
  • Interacting with the Internet of Things
  • Human Computer Interaction and User Experience

Further Information

The Forensic Computing degree was a great choice for me. I gained valuable skills and knowledge in computing and the discipline of digital forensics. The learning experience at UCLan was of high quality and covered a wide range of industry relevant skills which prepare you for your first graduate role.

The course focused on core computing concepts (databases, security, hardware, operating systems, programming and networks) and a wide range of modules covering forensic aspects such as data preservation, chain of custody, hardware, digital investigations and analysis techniques. The university also embedded employability skills throughout by giving me many opportunities to focus on some of the softer skills that most employers require.

ARMANDO NARDO

In the first year, you develop practical skills in software design and development, computer technology and a range of modern applications, and in managing small computer systems. You practise communication skills needed by forensic analysts. The common first year enhances your general computing knowledge and gives you the experience to ensure you have chosen the specialist course most suited to you.

Our common first year allows you to transfer to other computing courses, e.g. Computer Network Technology, Information Systems Design, Internet Software Development, Software Engineering, or Multimedia Development.

IT makes commerce and industry more efficient and effective, but also encourages and hides many crimes. As organisations become more dependent on sophisticated computers and communication to manage valuable data, they become more vulnerable to IT-based attacks. Moreover, the internet crosses international boundaries, making it easier to commit crimes but more difficult to identify and prosecute offenders. Forensic analysts play an important role in investigating and recovering from incidents. They use systematic methods to preserve, collect, and analyse digital evidence to reconstruct or anticipate crimes or abuse of company policies. They use sophisticated tools to investigate and interpret the evidence and present results clearly and fairly. Analysts require a high level of technical expertise, an understanding of computer-related crime, an appreciation of relevant law, a methodical approach to investigation, and the ability to explain complex technical ideas simply.

This course develops the specialist skills and knowledge required by the forensic analyst. This expertise may also lead to careers managing corporate IT resources, or as an information security specialist protecting servers and computers, and tracking intruders on networks. The course prepares you for many careers in computing because it develops a detailed understanding of computer systems, software development skills, logical reasoning, presentation skills, and an understanding of legal issues. This practical course uses the School’s communications and systems labs and a dedicated forensic computing lab, which has a range of analysis tools used by Police and commercial forensic analysts. A team project and a final-year individual project provide the opportunity to apply your skills to complex problems.


My time spent studying at UCLan greatly improved my career prospects. In particular the expertise and professionalism of my lecturers, course leaders and colleagues allowed me to take full advantage of the course and the knowledge that was available. Not only does the course have the correct equipment but it also has the people who know how to use and take advantage of the content. Although my career path does not involve computer forensics directly, without the support, course content and development that I received whilst studying at UCLan, I would not be where I am today.

Charles Lynch

I decided to take the forensic course mainly due to the broad array of avenues the course would allow me to follow after graduation. While the course concentrates on the forensic principles, this would not be possible to undertake without having knowledge in all avenues of how a computer, network, peripherals and the end user work.

I am currently employed as a business analyst, which I would not have been able to do without the experience gained through the course and for the hard work and dedication the lecturers provide. I enjoyed the course throughout and found it challenging every step of the way. I was attending the course full-time and was also a full-time carer for my wife. I worked part-time and if it wasn’t for the support of the university, my course leader and lecturers I would not have succeeded.

Andrew Irvine

Handbook

For detailed information about studying this course at UCLan, please see the course handbook for your year of entry:

Apply Now

You can apply through Clearing now to start this September. Call us on 01772 830777

Contact Us

+44(0)1772 892400

cenquiries@uclan.ac.uk

Fees 2018/19

Full-time: £9,250* per year (UK/EU)

*Tuition Fees are per year unless otherwise stated. Currently the 2018/19 fee level, which is due to increase in line with UK Retail Price Index inflation rates has not been announced by the Government.

Further information:

For 2017/18 fees please refer to our fees page.

Case Studies

Professional Accreditation

The course has accreditation leading to MBCS, CITP and partial CEng exemption from the British Computer Society, the computing professional body.

Learning Environment and Assessment

We emphasise practical-based learning using purpose-built laboratories and the University's general computer rooms. Our laboratories allow you to use specialist software and to do things that would not be allowed on a public network, e.g. configuring networks, exploring computer viruses or testing system security. We use the specialist software used by the Police and other forensic investigators. This includes a range of investigative software and multi-processor password cracking software. Where possible, we make software available for your own PC.

You will use an online learning environment to facilitate flexible learning. This environment enhances traditional face-to-face lectures, tutorials and practical sessions by providing additional, resource-rich, online materials allowing you to continue learning independently. You will have directed work to do outside timetabled classes.

Visiting fellows from industry will help you develop your skills, and you’ll get the opportunity to undertake a professional expert witness training course.

The course is assessed using individual coursework assignments, group work, presentations and exams, which may be seen or unseen. There is a practical emphasis with the main contribution to your degree classification coming from coursework.

Opportunities

You can take a one-year industrial placement after completing your second year. Most placements are UK-based, but we regularly place students in English-speaking workplaces elsewhere in Europe. It is possible to study a year of the course at a university abroad.

Most placements are UK-based, but we regularly place students in English-speaking workplaces elsewhere in Europe. It is possible to study a year of the course at a university abroad.

This course develops the specialist skills and knowledge required by the forensic analyst. This expertise may also lead to careers managing corporate IT resources, or as an information security specialist protecting servers and computers, and tracking intruders on networks. It prepares you for many careers in computing because it develops a detailed understanding of computer systems, software development skills, logical reasoning, presentation skills and an understanding of legal issues.

Many graduates seek careers as forensic analysts, security professionals or computer system managers, while others will work as software developers. The technical and interpersonal skills developed on the course will help in many graduate-level careers, particularly with the Police and other investigative agencies.