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Mechanical Maintenance Engineering (top-up)  (With Optional Placement) BEng (Hons)

Mechanical Maintenance Engineering (top-up) (With Optional Placement) BEng (Hons)

School of Engineering

UCAS Code

H391

Level

Under- graduate

Campus

Preston

Contact UCLan

University of Central Lancashire
Preston, PR1 2HE, United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1772 892400
Email: cenquiries@uclan.ac.uk

  • Duration:

    Full-time: One year. Part-time: Two years.

  • Level:

    Undergraduate

  • Delivery:

    Campus, Full-time and Part-time

  • UCAS Code:

    H391; Short form: BEng/MME3

  • Campus:

    Preston (Campus code: U)

  • Start Date:

    September

  • Award Type:

    BEng (Hons)

Why study this course?

Improve your foundation degree or HND in Mechanical Maintenance Engineering and move into a role with more responsibility and better prospects - not to mention higher earning potential… As a graduate, you’ll have the knowledge you need to use technological principles to solve engineering problems, generating innovative solutions to challenging issues in fields like maintenance, precision technologies, machine diagnostics, engineering management, and technology specification.  

There is still time to apply

Course at a Glance

Year 1

Compulsory modules

  • Manufacturing Technologies and Sustainable Manufacturing
  • Fundamentals of Engineering Simulation
  • Mechanical Systems Reliability
  • Material, Tribotechnology and Surface Engineering
  • Project

Optional modules - choose one

  • Project Management
  • Maintenance Management

With Industrial Placement

  • As above with an additional option (120 credits)
  • Optional module 8

With Work Placement

  • As above with an additional option (60 credits)
  • Optional module 9

Year 2 (Part-time only)

If studying part-time you can take up to three modules per year. Most students take two years to complete the award by the part-time route. Module 1, 4, 7 would normally be studied in Year 1 (Friday since 2009) with the three remaining modules studied in Year 2 (Tuesday since 2009)

Further Information

This course is designed to equip, and enable you to work as a graduate engineer through the skilled application of your knowledge of engineering. This may be in the fields of design, analysis, development, manufacture, application, sales and maintenance of high technology products, systems, and services. The course insists that you reflect on the processes that you apply that underpin engineering practice. You will need to evaluate the social, environmental and financial consequences of your actions as an engineer. We hope to provide you with an interesting and challenging engineering education. The content of this degree reflects the requirements for professional Incorporated Engineer status. However, although the content is designed to assist graduates in individual membership applications to the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for Incorporated Engineer status, it is not an accredited degree.

The course is delivered by staff from the School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences that are active in both research and knowledge transfer.

 

  • Dr. Ahmed Onsy is a lecturer in condition monitoring and maintenance engineering. He is lecturing mechanical systems reliability. His main research interests are intelligent diagnostics and health management systems, smart maintenance systems, advanced mechatronics and embedded systems.
  • Matthew Dickinson is lecturer and course leader for the BEng (Hons)/MEng Computer Aided Engineering course. He is lecturing in fundamental engineering simulation. He is currently completing a PhD in investigating the role of running-in in race engines.
  • Dr Hadley Brooks is a lecturer in our mechanical engineering courses. He is lecturing manufacturing and sustainable manufacturing. His area of research interest in additive manufacturing.
  • Gonzalo Garcia-Atance Fatjo is a lecturer in engineering. He is lecturing materials, tribology and surface engineering. Gonzalo is research active within the area of tribotechnology and is a member of the Jost Institute.
  • Dr Nathalie Renevier is a senior lecturer and course leader for both BEng (Hons) Mechanical Maintenance Engineering and MSc Maintenance Engineering. She is lecturing maintenance management and is coordinating all the undergraduates projects. Her area of research is surface engineering (coatings, surface treatments)
  • Professor Ian Sherrington is Professor of Tribotechnology and Director of the Jost Institute. He contributes to mechanical systems reliability.
  • Professor Ted Smith is honorary professor. He contributes to mechanical systems reliability. His expertise is in Lubrication and lubrication management.

 

    The BEng (Hons) Mechanical Maintenance Engineering (Top-up) course consists of five core modules plus one module from a choice of options. 

    Module 1: Manufacturing Technologies and Sustainable Manufacturing
    This module introduces you to modern manufacturing with four areas of emphasis: manufacturing processes, equipment/control, systems, and design for manufacturing. It exposes you to integration of engineering and management disciplines for determining manufacturing rate, cost, quality and flexibility. Pollution prevention initiatives by the government and consumer awareness of “green” products have placed increased pressure on industry to study and evaluate the disposability of their products and manufacturing waste streams. Particularly impacted are machine tool builders and their customers who often generate large quantities of process wastes. Ever more attention is turning to such issues as machine-tool energy efficiency, effective use of lubricant and coolant flows, and methods of process waste disposal. Increased emphasis on the environment is causing these issues to assume a more important role in determining competitive position. This module will investigate the environmental consciousness of machine tool systems, and will address fundamental areas of sustainability.

     

    Module 2 : Engineering Simulation 
    Numerical simulation of first and second order systems using Euler integration and Microsoft Excel with extensions into MATLAB to extend knowledge of integration methods and methods of presenting differential equations. Dynamic and steady state characteristics of first and second order systems. Use of one or more of Matlab, Simulink and SimMechanics to introduce modeling and analysis of increasingly complex mechanical systems. An aspect of the work will include the consideration of the pressures and wear that can occur with systems in motion. Use of Ansys for FEA and possibly CFD. You will analyse, evaluate and validate an appropriate loading problem. Extend the analysis of the problem to include consideration of other factors such as fatigue and wear.

    Module 3: Mechanical Systems Reliability
    Energy usage in industry; statistics and patterns of failure; physical causes of failure – fatigue, wear, corrosion, electrical erosion, plastic deformation, fracture; failure mechanisms of some machine elements – rolling-element bearings, hydrodynamic bearings, dry and partially-lubricated bearings, and gears; principal causes of friction and wear, and methods to ameliorate them; Fundamentals of fluid-film lubrication; use of modern, computerised guides to design dry and lubricated contacts.

    Module 4: Materials, Tribology and Surface Engineering
    Structures of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites; descriptions of elastic and plastic deformation of materials; failure of materials and structures by fast fracture and fatigue; description of alloys by phase diagrams, illustrated by examples of light alloys and steels; modification of alloy properties by heat treatment; relevance of surface topography and materials properties to friction and wear; economic and ecological costs of friction, wear and lubrication; lubrication regimes; modification of surface structure and properties by surface engineering; benefits for the environment of clean surface engineering technologies.

    Module 5: Project
    Project specification and planning; time management; presentation and interim/progress reports; writing final reports and discussing your project.


    Choose one of the following options:

    Module 6: Project Management
    Defining a project; project; governance - role of project managers & stakeholders; project planning; risk identification/analysis; project implementation; project finance (EVM); case studies.

    Module 7: Maintenance Management
    This module examines the main methods for developing a modern maintenance programme for industrial plants. It provides a comprehensive understanding of theory and practice of reliability centred maintenance and total productive maintenance strategies to achieve high plant availability, optimise on product quality, and address safety and environmental issues. The module will also consider shutdown and turnaround within maintenance of complex systems.

    The following placement modules are also available:

    Module 8 - Industrial Placement (Engineering)

     

    This module allows students to develop an understanding of the professional practices associated with working in the engineering industry. Students will research, secure and undertake a period of work experience or industrial placement in an organisation appropriate to the field of study. The placement period should normally cover a minimum of 38 weeks full-time throughout the course of the module and a maximum of 40 weeks. Subject to negotiation with tutors, the placement might extend across more than one organisation. Students will be expected to reflect upon this work experience critically and to apply their experience to theoretical and conceptual elements of their course.

    Module 9 -Work Placement (Engineering)

    This module allows students to develop an understanding of the professional practices associated with working in the engineering industry. Students will research, secure and undertake a period of work experience or industrial placement in an organisation appropriate to the field of study. The placement period should normally cover a minimum of 10 weeks full-time throughout the course of the module and a maximum of 15 weeks. Subject to negotiation with tutors, the placement might extend across more than one organisation. Students will be expected to reflect upon this work experience critically and to apply their experience to theoretical and conceptual elements of their course.

    Course Specification and Handbook

    For a concise summary of the main features of this course, see our course specification.
    For information on possible changes to course information, see our Important Information.

    For detailed information about studying this course at UCLan, please see the course handbook for your year of entry:

    Apply Now

    You can apply through UCAS to start in September 2017 until 30th June

    Contact Us

    +44(0)1772 892400

    cenquiries@uclan.ac.uk

    Fees 2017/18

    Full-time: £9,250 per year (UK/EU)

    Tuition Fees are per year unless otherwise stated and may be subject to increase annually in line with UK Retail Price Index inflation rate

    Further information:

    For 2016/17 fees please refer to our fees page.

    Scholarships and bursaries

    Industry Links

    Over the past few years students have ben taken on field trips to several organisations including Leyland Trucks.

    UCLan BEng Mechanical Engineering Industry Links

    Professional Accreditation

    The content of this degree reflects the requirements for professional Incorporated Engineer status. However, although the content is designed to assist graduates in individual membership applications to the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for Incorporated Engineer status, it is not an accredited degree. If your HND or foundation degree were accredited, you will be able to seek membership with the IET.

    Learning Environment and Assessment

    The course adopts a range of approaches to the delivery of curriculum including: case studies, lectures, practical sessions, independent learning guided by a tutor and tutorial sessions.

    Assessment of learning is conducted by a range of methods including: tutorial questions, examination, use of online assessment via Blackboard questions, extended assignments, presentations, poster defence and written reports.

    The course is linked with the Jost Institute of Tribotechnology, meaning there is a collaborative working environment and a close link with a vibrant, research-active community.

    Opportunities

    The majority of our students are in already in employment. Full-time students can enrol with Unites Internships, which is open to all final year students and graduates and provide the opportunity for work experience placements within the North West. Such placements provide valuable experience to both UK/EU and overseas students alike.

    On successful completion of this course, you will be eligible to apply for progression to postgraduate studies.

    A first or second class honours degree in mechanical maintenance engineering will allow you to proceed to a master's programme. You will have the opportunity to study the MSc Maintenance Engineering at UCLan and may also apply to any master's in mechanical engineering, manufacturing, product design or management.

    A third class honour degree in mechanical maintenance engineering will allow you to proceed to further postgraduate studies. You may consider the PGDip in Maintenance Engineering at UCLan and may be able to transfer to the MSc after successful completion of the PGDip. You can also apply to study for a PGDip in mechanical engineering, manufacturing, product design and in some cases to a master's in management courses.

    Mechanical maintenance engineering students who graduate without honours may be restricted in their profession to postgraduate education and may wish to consider completing an alternative Bachelor's degree with honours.

    Mechanical maintenance engineering graduates are in greater demand than ever and due to a shortage in this field, a world of career options is available to you. You could find yourself working in aerospace, the automotive industry, biotechnology, construction, manufacturing, utilities, the Ministry of Defence or local authorities as well as service industries. Once you have several years' experience, you could also look at self-employment via contract work, and occasionally consultancy.

    All our graduates are in employment or have undertaken postgraduate studies. Graduates in mechanical maintenance engineering typically secure employment in engineering industries including structural engineering, automotive engineering and design, aerospace industry, manufacturing, processing and chemical industries, oil and gas, as well as management positions.

    We have a 100% track record of graduate employment - plus you’ll study alongside a diverse group of students from a variety of backgrounds.

    Adrien Anseur is undertaking a master’s degree in Automotive Engineering in Turin, Italy, while Dan Nsikakabasi is working in Nigeria for Exxon Mobil.

    Wesley Barrett is now New Product Development Team Leader at Siemens Energy.

    UCLan provided a very conducive environment for anyone who was serious about focusing and succeeding in his or her studies. The tutors were very supportive and accommodating while the facilities were encouraging and the study materials and resources were generously made available for use. Above all, I was impressed by the numerous programmes, workshops and customised guidance services rendered through UCLan's Futures.

    Dan Nsikakabasi